Back to top

Webinars

The NCTSN has produced dozens of webinar series, comprised of virtual presentations by expert researchers and practitioners, on various topics in the field of child traumatic stress. Most webinars are from 60 to 90 minutes in length and are available for continuing education credit.

NCTSN Resource

Working with Homeless and Runaway Youth

Type: Webinar

Provides statistics on the number and characteristics of homeless youth in the US. This webinar reviews the unique aspects of trauma among runaway and homeless youth and identifies the key treatment implications for this population.

NCTSN Resource

Complexity of Trauma

Type: Webinar

Discusses the complexity of children's reaction to and processing of traumatic events.

NCTSN Resource

Impact of Trauma in Very Young Children

Type: Webinar

Defines trauma in the early years and discusses the sources of traumatic events. This webinar describes the impact of trauma on a child's early development and discusses the role caregivers play in a child's response to trauma, as well as treatment goals when treating both child and parent.

NCTSN Resource

Impact of Trauma on Early Brain Development

Type: Webinar

Synthesizes research and clinical knowledge about typical brain development and the high impact that the stress response has on the developing brain. This webinar highlights the clinical application for clinicians and other professionals who work with traumatized children.

NCTSN Resource

Trauma Assessment

Type: Webinar

Outlines the major issues associated with the assessment of trauma in children and adolescents. This webinar includes psychometrics, comparison between the benefits and limitations of self-reporting and caretaker reports, specific targets for evaluation, and choice of assessment instruments.

NCTSN Resource

Trauma's Impact on Development Across Childhood

Type: Webinar

Presents three experienced clinician-researchers in the field of child traumatic stress highlighting the developmental impact of child trauma on early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence.

Pages