Georgia State University

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - Georgia
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The National Center on Child Trafficking (NCCT) is a collaboration of professionals who use a science-driven approach to guide the development, adaptation, implementation and evaluation of trauma-focused interventions and resources to improve the lives of children and families impacted by commercial sexual exploitation and trafficking for sex and labor (CSET). The NCCT will (1) develop and disseminate national practice standards and consensus guidelines for Mental Health treatment crosscutting Evidence-based Practices, (2) deliver and evaluate training of TF-CBT for CSET and develop resources for therapists and trainers to enhance dissemination  and service delivery, (3) develop and disseminate standards, guidelines, and training addressing co-occurring trauma and substance use problems and integrate the guidelines into an existing evidence-based trauma and substance use treatment (Risk Reduction through Family Therapy), (4) adapt and disseminate training  in trauma-informed parenting, the Resource Parent Curriculum, adapted for youth who have experienced CSET, (5) adapt and disseminate training in trauma-informed residential care, Think Trauma. for staff at targeted CSET congregate care/residential treatment placements, (6) develop and disseminate resources for MDT and CSET specialist professionals, including practice guidelines and training curricula (FORECAST) incorporating CSET response, (7) develop Secondary Traumatic Stress/Compassion Satisfaction awareness materials and strategies and disseminate to professionals serving youth who have experienced CSET.

Location:
14 Marietta St. NW
Atlanta , GA 30303
Staff:

International Rescue Committee, Center for Adjustment, Resilience and Recovery (CARRE)

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - New York
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The Center for Adjustment, Resilience and Recovery (CARRE), housed within the International Rescue Committee's (IRC) Resettlement, Asylum and Integration (RAI) department, represents a collaborative effort between the IRC and multiple NCTSN Cat. II and Cat. III Centers. CARRE seeks to ensure that refugee, asylum-seeking, and other forcibly displaced children, youth, and families receive culturally responsive, evidence-based, and trauma-focused treatments and service interventions across a wide array of systems to mitigate the long-term, negative impacts of childhood traumatic stress. CARRE seeks to do so by 1. Developing the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and resources to effectively serve forcibly displaced children, youth and families coping with traumatic stress; 2. Effectively implementing culturally adapted, evidence-based and trauma-focused evidence-based treatments with forcibly displaced children, youth, and families; and 3. Increasing knowledge exchange between intervention, population, and systems experts in the fields of child traumatic stress, forced migration, refugee and asylum services and systems, cultural adaptation and responsiveness, and communities with lived experience.

Location:
122 E 42nd Street
New York , NY 10168
Staff:

Justice Resource Institute - Building Resilience through Residential Communities

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - Massachusetts
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The Building Resilience through Residential Communities (BRTRC) project is a Category II Treatment and Services Adaptation Center. The BRTRC's central aim is to develop, adapt, and disseminate trauma-informed care (TIC) approaches and evidence-based practices (EBPs) for residential treatment centers (RTCs) nationwide that serve high risk, trauma-impacted youth and their families. The BRTRC's mission is to address key gaps in available strategies for implementation of TIC in RTCs, increase access to effective EBPs for youth in residential care, and bolster workforce development in RTCs. Through these activities, the BRTRC will raise the standard of care, increase resiliency of programs, staff and clients, and improve client clinical outcomes. The primary goals of the BRTRC project are: (1) wide scale dissemination, implementation and sustainability of Building Communities of Care (BCC), a trauma and evidenced informed, strengths based model designed to address the unique needs of RTCs, through training and TA with all staff (front line, clinical, educational, medical, administrative); (2) to increase access to EBPs for trauma in RTCs serving trauma-impacted youth through intensive training and technical assistance in EBPs that have demonstrated effectiveness with YRC, including Attachment, Regulation, and Competency (ARC), Trauma Focused CBT (TF-CBT), and Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS); and (3) to build a trauma-informed workforce in RTCs through education, training and technical assistance via both intensive RTC partnerships and national dissemination activities. The BRTRC expert staff provide intensive training and technical assistance to RTCs across the nation.

Location:
Needham , MA
Staff:

Long Island Jewish Medical Center

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - New York
Funding Period:
2016-2021, 2021-2026

Our Category II site at LIJ Medical Center is promoted by our STRYDD Center which as its name implies defines our mission: Supporting Trauma Recovery for Youth with Developmental Disabilities. We seek to increase the capacity of communities in awareness, cross systems collaboration and trauma informed intervention on behalf of youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and their families who have been impacted by trauma. We strive to create a best fit in terms of community needs with an individualized dissemination plan to include increase in knowledge of trauma & IDD (by means of Road to Recovery Toolkit, Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma IDD case examples), enhancing trauma informed clinical care (consultation on screening/assessment, training in TF-CBT) and advanced training for tailoring trauma informed intervention for youth with IDD. We encourage all network members to become familiar with the unique challenges impacting this vulnerable population by accessing our several fact sheets for providers and caregivers on the NCTSN website. Additionally, clinicians can review a series of webinars on adapting trauma based interventions for these youth. Our goals for this current funding cycle include the construction of various clinician guides to accompany our advanced trainings in Tailoring TF-CBT, Adapting Evidence-Based Trauma treatments more generally, and Trauma-Informed ABA. Additionally, we are implementing a school based approach in Stress First Aid (SFA) in support of the impact of COVID-19 on the school community, especially involving those serving special education students.

Location:
75-59 263rd Street
Glen Oaks , NY 11004
Staff:

Medical University of South Carolina

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - South Carolina
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The Telehealth Outreach Program for Traumatic Stress (TOP-TS) will support wide-scale knowledge, implementation, resources, and sustainability of a telehealth service delivery model for Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for underserved youth (i.e., racial/ethnic and/or linguistic minorities, rural, low SES) in the mainland US and Puerto Rico. TOP-TS will provide 1) education about telehealth, 2) training and technical assistance with ongoing consultation and support, and 3) culturally/linguistically competent resources, national guidelines and best practices to support the mental health workforce in the implementation of TF-CBT via telehealth. Populations Served: The TOP-TS team will provide education, training and technical assistance (TTA) services and resources to the mental health workforce delivering TF-CBT via telehealth in Child Advocacy Centers, Community Mental Health Clinics, schools, juvenile justice, and other child-serving agencies targeting rural and underserved trauma-exposed youth and families in the mainland US and Puerto Rico. TOP-TS will promote equitable access to care for racially, ethnically and linguistically diverse children and families through the use of a telehealth service delivery model. Strategies and Interventions: TOP-TS will increase knowledge of telehealth protocols and best practices to deliver telehealth TF-CBT through educational webinars about telehealth best-practices and adaptations for unique service settings and populations. We will create a series of protocols, training materials, and resources to aid implementation. We will offer evidence-based TTA and ongoing implementation support with the goal of wide-scale implementation of telehealth delivery of TF-CBT.

Location:
67 President Street, MSC 861
Charleston , SC 29425
Staff:

National American Indian and Alaska Native Child Trauma TSA Center, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Iowa

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - Iowa
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The National American Indian and Alaska Native Child Trauma Center TSA, Category II, located in the University of Iowa College of Public Health, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, within the Native Center for Behavioral Health. The Center's main focus is to increase national infrastructure for the Native and non-Native workforce to effectively prevent and reduce childhood trauma and increase wellness and resiliency among AI/AN children, adolescents, and their families. American Indian and Alaska Native people face traumas resulting from abuse, neglect, and household stressors. In addition, AI/AN children are also affected by racism, poverty, and the legacy of insidious historical oppression and trauma. Despite the elevated risk, there is limited empirical information to guide culturally appropriate treatments of trauma and related symptoms for this population. The National AI/AN TSA Center aims to identify, adapt, disseminate, and provide implementation support to the workforce serving AI/AN youth and their families impacted by trauma. We will offer support for service systems (e.g., schools, juvenile justice, child welfare, and healthcare settings) working with children. Anne Helene Skinstad, Ph.D., clinical psychologist educated in Norway, with focus on Childhood mental health disorders and trauma and have 25 years of experience working with behavioral health workforce, including substance use and mental health disorders in Native communities. Teresa Brewington, MBA, MEd, an enrolled member of The Coharie and descendent the Lumbe tribe, has worked for many years in the K - 12 school system as a teacher, counselor, and principal of a Native School and have experience working with Native children who have experienced Adverse Childhood Experiences.

Location:
145 N. Riverside Drive
Iowa City , IA 52242
Staff:

National Child Trauma Workforce Institute, Lyda Hill Institute for Human Resilience, University of Colorado Colorado Springs

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - Colorado
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The National Child Trauma Workforce Institute (NCTWI), hosted at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Lyda Hill Institute for Human Resilience, has a vision of raising the standard of care for trauma exposed children and families by raising the standard of trauma education and training of those who serve them. NCTWI will address the national child-serving workforce's need for trauma education by providing training, consultation and technical assistance to expand the use of the Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma (CCCT), an evidence-based trauma training curriculum. The goals of UCCS-NCTWI are to 1) build the trauma response capacity of the US mental health workforce by expanding the number of trained CCCT facilitators across the NCTSN; 2) integrate the CCCT into trauma education within Psychology and Child Psychiatry training programs and across the professional lifespan; and 3) increase the impact of CCCT training on improved trauma-informed clinical and organizational practices by expanding long-term evaluation and identifying key training components and strategies.

Location:
4863 North Nevada Avenue
Colorado Springs , CO 80918
Staff:

National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - South Carolina
Funding Period:
2021-2026

Our NCTSI-II Center, Enhancing Equity, Quality and Impact of evidence-based Practices for Trauma using Technology (EQUIPTT), is housed within the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina. EQUIPTT aims to increase equitable access and quality of trauma-focused evidence-based interventions (EBIs) across diverse youth and families by (1) developing, disseminating and implementing technology-based scalable products and (2) serving as a national resource for training, education and technical assistance. EQUIPTT has four goals: (1) increase availability of technology-enhanced, evidence-based resources across the NCTSN; (2) build workforce capacity to deliver Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT) and Risk Reduction through Family Therapy (RRFT) for youth with traumatic stress and high-risk behavior; (3) disseminate technology-based resources to improve sustained delivery of trauma-focused EBIs; and (4) expand access to trauma-focused EBIs across service systems. Our strategies are to (1) support efforts to develop and disseminate technology-based products by providing consultation and creating a Technology Development Toolkit (TDT) for national dissemination; (2) build workforce capacity by conducting Learning Collaboratives supplemented by technology-assisted training and provider assistance tools in TFCBT, RRFT, and traumatic grief (CTGWeb) to address grief and loss, which has been exacerbated by COVID; and (3) launch mobile app-based EBIs to address PTSD and depression among disaster-affected youth and adapt to a broad array of traumatic events. Dissemination efforts will prioritize partnerships to expand reach into underserved populations.

Location:
National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina Charleston , SC
Staff:

National Initiative for Trauma Education and Workforce Development at UNC School of Social Work

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - North Carolina
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The National Initiative for Trauma Education and Workforce Development at the UNC School of Social Work is committed to better enable mental health treatment providers to use common trauma-informed practice elements (CTIPE) in their treatment of traumatized youth and their families. The objectives are to (1) increase the capacity of clinicians at all NCTSN Category II and III sites to employ common trauma-informed practice elements in their treatment of traumatized youth and their families; (2) annually increase this capacity via a new course at 15-20 schools of social work reaching; and (3) strengthen and expand the national impact of the Center's initiatives through broad collaborations with NCTSN Centers, among mental health professionals, and across disciplines. These collaborations will further disseminate information about and best practices for trauma-related care among developers, practitioners, service providers, and consumers with a focus on reducing health disparities. To achieve these goals, we will develop a new intervention product, a case-based curriculum examining common trauma-informed practice elements that will form the foundation of 1) a free online training resource for mental health providers and 2) a 3-credit clinical graduate course for MSW programs. The new intervention product will build on existing resources in the NCTSN, specifically the Core Concepts training and common trauma informed practice elements and will prioritize agencies with a majority BIPOC client population and MSW programs in HBCUs. The national impact will be activated by a diverse 14-15-member Advisory Board consisting of representatives from youth trauma survivors and family members, students, faculty, practitioners.

Location:
325 Pittsboro St
Chapel Hill , NC 27599
Staff:

Network for Enhancing Wellness in Disaster-Affected Youth (NEW DAY)

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - Florida
Funding Period:
2021-2026

The Network for Enhancing Wellness in Disaster-Affected Youth (NEW DAY) provides national expertise, training, and technical assistance on the behavioral health needs and intervention of youth in disaster-hit and disaster-prone communities. Under the direction of Dr. Jonathan Comer, NEW DAY works to improve professional knowledge, skill, adoption, and implementation of evidence-based, trauma-focused disaster services and supports for youth, with a primary emphasis on meaningfully reducing racial and ethnic disparities in post-disaster behavioral health and service provision. NEW DAY engages with school systems, youth-serving professionals, families, community agencies, stakeholder partners, and technology to broaden the reach and sustainability of supported behavioral health programs for trauma-exposed youth, including Psychological First Aid (PFA), Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR), and Child-Adult Relationship Enhancement (CARE).

Location:
Center for Children and Families | Florida International University | 11200 S.W. 8th Street
Miami , FL 33199
Staff:

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