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Network Members

This listing of NCTSN members includes current grantees as well as NCTSN Affiliates, former grantees who have maintained their ties to the Network.

UC Davis Early Psychosis Programs, Department of Psychiatry

Community Treatment and Services Centers - Category III - California
Funding Period:
2021-2026

Comorbid trauma and psychosis are common yet under-recognized in juvenile justice (JJ), child welfare (CW), and community mental health (CMH) settings; and recognized youth do not receive appropriate services. The Trauma and Adolescent Mental Illness (TAMI) Services Project triples the capacity of service providers in Sacramento County, CA, to provide evidence-based services for youth (age 12-22) with comorbid trauma and psychosis in JJ, CW, and CMH settings. Project goals are: 1) Increase capacity of child-serving systems to identify and appropriately link youth experiencing trauma and psychosis symptoms by implementing a universal screening and referral protocol in Sac County JJ and CW settings; 2) Increase the capacity of Sac County CMH services to provide evidence-based trauma-focused care for youth with comorbid trauma and psychosis by implementing a curriculum that addresses the training needs of CMH providers. TAMI services comprise Trauma-Informed Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis (TI-CBTp; Folk et al., 2019), developed in collaboration by the UC Davis (UCD) SacEDAPT clinic and UCD CAARE Center. We implemented TAMI services in the SacEDAPT clinic in 2014, have provided care to over 65 youth, and built capacity for 25 cases per year. Unfortunately, an estimated 100 system-involved youth need TAMI services annually in Sac County, and SacEDAPT is the only Sac County provider of TAMI services. This project will increase TAMI service capacity in Sac County by expanding to 6 additional CMH sites. Our team is uniquely positioned carry out this work: the SacEDAPT clinic and CAARE Center have an established partnership and are nationally recognized leaders in the development and implementation of EBPs for youth with trauma and psychosis in diverse settings.

Location:
2230 Stockton Blvd
Sacramento , CA 95817
Staff:

UC Davis/ Pediatrics/ CAARE Diagnostic & Treatment Center

Community Treatment and Services Centers - Category III - California
Funding Period:
2016-2021, 2021-2026

For more than 25 years, UC Davis CAARE Center has provided evidence-based treatment to maltreated children in Sacramento County and contributed to the evidence base supporting the use of these interventions with this vulnerable population. While mental health services are available to children in foster care, they can take months to begin, they may not receive services without obvious symptoms, and services targeted at the child rarely include the biological parent. Additionally, birth parents are often reluctant to seek help for difficult visits for fear that it will reflect poorly upon their parenting or extend the child's time in care. Resource caregivers also receive limited support for navigating the biological parent-resource parent relationship and may struggle with helping children cope with conflicted feelings and difficult visit interactions. The current Category III project screens children for trauma and comorbid disorders and provides an adaptation of the brief (7-session) Parent-Child Care (PC-CARE) intervention to all biological parents of children aged 1-10 years participating in visits. The adaptation combines three services: PC-CARE with biological parents to increase access to services and support good quality visits, consultation to resource parents around the visitation process and children's responses to trauma, and an online PC-CARE resource to promote generalization of skills to support children's well-being. PC-CARE offers a novel approach to supporting reunification and reducing children's trauma-related symptoms by providing empirically supported coping and parenting skills at a key point during the family's transition, without the family's need to seek out or wait for a referral for intervention.

Location:
3671 Commons Dr.
Sacramento , CA 95820
Website:
Staff:

UCLA - Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (CA)

National Center for Child Traumatic Stress - Category I - California
Funding Period:
2001-2005, 2005-2009, 2009-2012, 2012-2016, 2016-2021

The UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and the Duke University School of Medicine jointly host the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NCCTS), leading the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) in transforming treatment and services to meet the needs of traumatized children and their families across the United States. Through extensive expertise, resources, organizational experience, and vision, the NCCTS guides and supports the NCTSN. The NCCTS also provides strong technical assistance to support Network data collection, cross-site collaborative activities, product development and dissemination, training, adoption and adaptation of interventions, communications, policy analysis and initiatives, and program evaluation.

Location:
11150 Olympic Blvd Suite 650
Los Angeles , CA 90064
Work:
(310) 235-2633
Staff:

UCLA - Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NC)

National Center for Child Traumatic Stress - Category I - North Carolina
Funding Period:
2001-2005, 2005-2009, 2009-2012, 2012-2016, 2016-2021

The UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and the Duke University School of Medicine jointly host the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NCCTS), leading the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) in transforming treatment and services to meet the needs of traumatized children and their families across the United States. Through extensive expertise, resources, organizational experience, and vision, the NCCTS guides and supports the NCTSN. The NCCTS also provides strong technical assistance to support Network data collection, cross-site collaborative activities, product development and dissemination, training, adoption and adaptation of interventions, communications, policy analysis and initiatives, and program evaluation.

Location:
1121 West Chapel Hill Street Suite 201
Durham , NC 27701
Work:
(919) 682-1552 x246
Staff:

UCLA-Duke Adolescent Suicide/Self Harm & Substance Abuse Prevention (CA)

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - California
Funding Period:
2016-2021

The UCLA-Duke Adolescent Suicide/Self Harm & Substance Abuse Prevention (ASAP) will serve as a resource for information related to safety, suicidal/self-harm behaviors, and substance use among trauma-exposed youths. We prioritize services for emergency/acute care and brief time-limited treatments, adapting for the trauma-exposed population and then disseminating two brief evidence-based interventions for suicide/self-harm risk (Emergency/Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention; SAFETY) and two for substance abuse (Screening/Motivational Interviewing(MI); CBT with MI/optional contingency management). To inform and develop optimal service strategies for improving outcomes for trauma-exposed youths, the Center will also work to develop and strengthen trauma informed care that integrates care for adolescent behavioral health within primary care, emergency, and other medical settings, as well as other mental health, school, and community settings. We will utilize surveillance data on suicide/self-harm and substance abuse risk in the NCTSN population to guide this work. Intervention training and dissemination will include technology-enhanced tools/materials and data-informed supervision systems and clinical dashboards to enhance quality of care and client outcomes. Through trainings/dissemination activities, the Center aims to serve diverse youths, across racial and ethnic groups. sexual identities and orientations, socioeconomic groups, and address needs of youths in military families. Our Center goal is to support providers and service systems in addressing safety issues and substance misuse effectively, thereby enhancing the benefits of other treatments that specifically target post-traumatic stress disorders/reactions.

Location:
Los Angeles , CA
Staff:

UCLA-Duke Adolescent Suicide/Self Harm & Substance Abuse Prevention (NC)

Organizational Affiliate - North Carolina
Funding Period:
2016-2021

The Center for Trauma-Informed Adolescent Suicide, Self-Harm, and Substance Misuse Treatment and Prevention (ASAP) trains health and mental health care professionals in state of the art trauma-informed treatments for self-harm, suicide prevention, substance abuse, and depression with the aim of empowering children, adolescents, young adults, and their families to recover from mental health problems and build lives they want to live. The UCLA-Duke ASAP Center provides national expertise on adolescents affected by trauma, emphasizing services for trauma-affected youth with suicidal/self-harm behavior and substance misuse, and those from underserved marginalized groups. By providing training and information on evidence-based care for trauma, suicide/self-harm, and substance misuse, the Center comprises a national resource, with potential to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with traumatic stress, suicidal/self-harm behavior and substance misuse. We provide trainings on brief evidence-based interventions for acute care and stabilization. These include: 1) SAFETY-Acute (A), a trauma-informed emergency/acute care intervention for suicidal and self-harm behavior (also called Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention), which aims to link youth to trauma-focused or other evidence-based treatments once safety is established; 2) the related 12-week SAFETY intervention for youth requiring additional stabilization after a suicidal/self-harm episode; and 3) motivational interviewing plus cognitive-behavior therapy for substance using adolescents. The ASAP Center also collaborates with other organizations within the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and other SAMHSA initiatives to strengthen national capacity and expand and train the workforce for responding to child traumatic stress and reduce risk of associated suicidal behavior, self-harm, and substance use.

Location:
2608 Erwin Road, Suite 300
Durham , NC
Staff:

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Department of Family and Preventative Medicine (DFPM) Research and Evaluation Division (RED)

Community Treatment and Services Centers - Category III - Arkansas
Funding Period:
2012-2016, 2021-2026

UAMS's Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Research and Evaluation Division (DFPM RED) focuses on family and environmental factors linked with poor health, growth, and psychosocial development. We conduct research to test theoretical models, collaborate with community partners to implement and evaluate interventions, train on research-based curriculum, and translate those models into community settings. We partner with communities and community organizations to implement and evaluate programs intended to improve outcomes. Many of our projects take research-based knowledge and translate it into practice. Our training programs target professionals in community-based settings such as early care and education, mental health, home visits, shelters, and substance abuse treatment.

Location:
4301 West Markham Street
Little Rock , AR 72205
Staff:

University of CA Los Angeles Department of Pediatrics

Organizational Affiliate - California
Funding Period:
2016-2021

Over the past five years, we collaboratively developed PATTeR (Pediatric Approach to Trauma, Treatment and Resilience) as a successful foundation for transforming pediatrics into a trauma-informed and responsive system of care. PATTeR is a partnership of the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Guided by its National Advisory Board (NAB) and the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, PATTeR incorporated the latest science from multiple fields (resilience, attachment, parenting, neuroscience, evidence-based trauma-informed mental health interventions) into an evidence-based and practical curriculum for pediatricians.  PATTeR developed, implemented and evaluated a novel trauma-informed care (TIC) curriculum for pediatricians; adapted the curriculum to resident education; and piloted a learning collaborative focused on implementing TIC into pediatric practice. PATTeR has introduced 30,000 professionals to TIC and provided in-depth training to 800 physicians, including >100 residents. Completers of in-depth training reported an average increase in proficiency of 1.8 levels on a scale of 1 to 6 on TIC elements (eg, serve and return, predictable compassionate availability, co-regulation).  We continue to seek funding to continue the work.

Location:
10833 LeConte Ave, Room 12-358
Los Angeles , CA 90095
Staff:

University of California, Davis/ Dept. of Pediatrics/ CAARE Center

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - California
Funding Period:
2021-2026

UC Davis CAARE Center's PCIT & PC-CARE Training Center has provided quality training, consultation and technical assistance to agencies and individuals in understanding how trauma impacts children and their families since 1999 and now provides training and trainer certification in a brief parenting intervention, Parent-Child Care (PC-CARE), using these same empirically supported strategies. There is a strong demand for training in trauma-informed, evidence-based parenting treatments suitable for young children and a deficit of mental health providers. At the same time, mental health service needs among children, particularly in vulnerable low-income and immigrant populations, is increasing. Thus, many agencies look to paraprofessionals, home visitors, and case managers to provide services to children and families in need. Whereas training and implementation of EBTs has become more effective and engaging for mental health professionals, training in trauma-informed care and practices for paraprofessionals has lagged. This Category II project is designed to overcome these barriers to training paraprofessionals and non-mental health professionals that work with traumatized children with training in PC-CARE and PC-CARE Toolbox. PC-CARE is a brief, effective parenting intervention that demonstrates high retention rates (90%) and can be delivered by non-licensable mental health providers. It provides an early and rapid screening, assessment, and intervention for traumatized children in diverse settings. PC-CARE Toolbox, for workers in child-serving but non-mental health settings, uses a web-based interactive platform to teach about child development, child trauma, and PC-CARE skills, as well as consultation and documentation to give experiential training and support.

Location:
3671 Business Dr.
Sacramento , CA 95820
Website:
Staff:

University of California, Los Angeles (Szilagyi)

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - California
Funding Period:
2016-2021

The Pediatric Approach to Trauma, Treatment and Resilience (PATTeR) is a multi-site project. The three project sites include the American Academy of Pediatrics, the University of Massachusetts Medical School and UCLA's Section on Developmental Studies. The focus of PATTeR is to develop curricula focused on trauma and resilience specifically for pediatricians who are the first child professionals family encounter and the most frequent gate-keepers to subspecialty care, including trauma-informed mental health care, and to supportive community-based services. During year one, we will focus on developing two levels of curricula: Trauma Aware and Trauma Informed. Through the AAP, which is the professional home of over 60,000 pediatricians across the United States, we will recruit pediatricians serving children and families in a variety of settings but focus on those serving certain high risk groups: those living in poverty, involved with child welfare or social services, those living in resource-poor areas and military families. Case-based learning designed to lead to practice change will occur in a group on-line format (using ECHO Technology) with an expert panel. Trauma Aware training will occur over 6 sessions. Pediatricians seeking to become trauma training resources in their own communities or AAP chapters will complete the more detailed Trauma-Informed training over 12 sessions. We will also recruit residency program leaders through the Academic Pediatrics Association to engage in both curricula since they are the educators who will transform pediatric residency education. We will also infuse curricula into multiple AAP education venues and anticipate reaching thousands of pediatricians during the grant cycle.

Location:
Los Angeles , CA
Staff:

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