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Network Members

This listing of NCTSN members includes current grantees as well as NCTSN Affiliates, former grantees who have maintained their ties to the Network.

Chaddock, Trauma Initiative of West Central Illinois

Organizational Affiliate - Illinois

Chaddock provides trauma-informed and attachment-based services to 17,000 children age 0-21 and their families annually in the rural community of Quincy, Illinois, and the surrounding tri-state area (Illinois, Iowa, Missouri). The following services are provided: outpatient and school-based counseling, therapeutic day program, foster care and post adoption, independent living, transitional living, group home, residential, and a specialized Developmental Trauma and Attachment Program that has served children from 27 states and 17 international countries. The NCTSN-endorsed trauma-informed interventions used at Chaddock include Psychological First Aid (PFA), Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS), Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS), and Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competence (ARC). In addition, Chaddock provides consultation and training services on attachment and trauma related topics, including PFA and SPARCS.

Location:
Quincy , IL
Staff:

Chadwick Center, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - California
Funding Period:
2002-2005, 2005-2009, 2010-2012, 2012-2016, 2016-2021

The Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego is creating the The Center for Child Welfare Trauma-Informed Policies, Programs, and Practices (TIPs Center) to support child welfare (CW) system efforts across the nation. The ultimate goal of the TIPs Center is for Trauma Informed (TI) knowledge and skills to permeate into CW organizational cultures, at all levels and among all roles, resulting in positive sustainable changes in the systems, policies, and practices which lead to better outcomes for children and families served by these systems. The Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit (CWTTT) is being transformed into four new curricula for use with specific targeted segments of the CW system workforce including caseworkers, supervisors, leaders (directors and managers), and support staff (receptionists, case aides, etc.). Information on how culture and trauma intersect is being wound into each of the curricula and all of them will be designed with a consultation/coaching framework. The TIPs Center is developing a system for training trainers across the country in these curricula and will provide continued support to these rostered trainers. Thoughtful consideration is being given to how to roll the adaptations out to communities that have already received the initial CWTTT training. Advanced training around topics such as secondary traumatic stress and screening and service array are also being developed. Additionally, the TIPs Center is working with CW training organizations to explore how TI concepts can be infused into existing core/foundational CW training.

Location:
San Diego , CA
Staff:

Child Health & Development Institute of CT

Community Treatment and Services Centers - Category III - Connecticut
Funding Period:
2016-2021

The Early Childhood Trauma Collaborative (ECTC) is developing a more trauma-informed early childhood system of care in Connecticut, with an emphasis on the state’s neediest communities. The ECTC is led by the Child Health and Development Institute (CHDI), an intermediary organization that has partnered with state and provider agencies to disseminate and sustain children’s behavioral health evidence-based practices for more than 10 years. The ECTC is a collaboration between CHDI, the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood, The Connecticut Department of Children and Families, The Consultation Center at Yale University (evaluator), a family partner, treatment developers at other NCTSN sites, and a network of community-based provider agencies. The ECTC is improving access to trauma-focused services for Connecticut’s young children aged birth through 7 exposed to violence, abuse, and other forms of trauma by: 1) disseminating evidence-based treatments in the community; 2) developing internal capacity to support sustainability of these EBPs; and 3) improving the ability of the state’s early childhood workforce to identify and refer children and families in need of trauma-focused services. The ECTC will disseminate and sustain Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency (ARC), Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Treatment (TARGET), and Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI).

Location:
Farmington , CT
Staff:

Child HELP Partnership, St. John’s University

Organizational Affiliate - New York
Funding Period:
2005-2009

Child HELP Partnership, develops and operates trauma-specific mental health programs with its innovative, scientifically supported protocols: 1) On the local level, to provide culturally adapted therapy and prevention services free-of-charge to underserved children and families in the surrounding communities. 2) On the national level, to develop and provide trainings, consultation, and oversight on these therapy methods and prevention programs to mental health professionals as well as the general public. These outreach strategies, evaluation tools, therapies, and prevention trainings are improving care across the country.

To ensure remaining on the scientific cutting edge, the programs incorporate evaluation systems for correcting, refining, and enhancing treatment so that the methodology can be continually modified and improved. The goal is to replicate the Child HELP Partnership Center’s well-documented results across the United States and abroad. The Partnership subscribes to the belief that all children deserve safe and happy childhoods, so each and every one can grow up to be a strong and healthy adult.
 
The name Child HELP Partnership reflects an integrated approach in four areas of focus:
•    Healing children after trauma using evidence-based therapies.
•    Empowering multicultural communities with access to the finest culturally sensitive mental health programs
•    Learning programs—both live and virtual—to educate professionals in the most innovative and effective methodologies
•    Public education for parents and others who interact with children on a regular basis, including educators, coaches, and people within their sphere of influence

Partnerships are formed with children with trauma histories, their families, the community as a whole, colleagues in the mental health field, and caregivers, parents, and others who interact with children regularly. These partnerships unite across cultures with all programs created to be language-accessible and culturally informed.

Location:
Queens , NY
Staff:

Children's Advocacy Services of Greater St. Louis at University of Missouri, St. Louis, The Families Learning About Recovery Project (FORECAST)

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - Missouri
Funding Period:
2012-2016, 2016-2021

Foundations for Out Reach through Experiential Child Advocacy Studies Training (FORECAST) is a collaboration of the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the University of Illinois-Springfield, the National Child Protection Training Center, and the National Children’s Alliance. FORECAST will disseminate the Core Concepts for Understanding Traumatic Stress Responses in Childhood to communities with Child Advocacy Studies (CAST) undergraduate university programs, equipping students from a range of child-serving disciplines as well as professionals in the local workforce with Trauma Informed Experiential Reasoning Skills (TIERS). The Core Concepts and TIERS will be disseminated via Problem Based Learning Simulations by undergraduate CAST faculty and community workforce trainers, who will be trained at FORECAST learning collaboratives. FORECAST anticipates impacting psychology, social work, criminal justice, sociology, education, and nursing students at the undergraduate level, and the full range of Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) members at the community level. We anticipate impacting not only the population trained, but also workforce retention as people are better prepared to enter a trauma-informed workforce and agencies are better prepared to receive new graduates.

Location:
St. Louis , MO
Staff:

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Inc., Georgia Child Traumatic Stress Initiative

Organizational Affiliate - Georgia
Funding Period:
2012-2016

The Georgia Child Traumatic Stress Initiative is a partnership between the Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children (CSHC) and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences of Emory University School of Medicine. The objectives of the project are to do the following: (1) provide trauma-informed services—including Trauma­Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)—to children and adolescents in metropolitan Atlanta; (2) offer webinars on mental health topics to child service agencies in the Atlanta community; (3) provide training in TF-CBT and mentoring in the application of evidence-based practices to multiple small groups of mental health providers who serve child victims of abuse/neglect in rural and underserved areas of north Georgia; and (4) develop and pilot a TF-CBT telemental health service to provide therapy to traumatized children and their families in rural and underserved areas of Georgia. 

Location:
Atlanta , GA
Staff:

Children's Home Society of Florida, Trauma Recovery Initiative

Community Treatment and Services Centers - Category III - Florida
Funding Period:
2007-2012, 2012-2016, 2016-2021

The Children’s Home Society of Florida (CHS) in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF) will enhance trauma informed care throughout the state of Florida at a Child and Family, Organizational, and System over the next 5 years. We will be providing EBPs to children in local schools specifically using the Real Life Heroes Model. The children, ranging in age from 6 – 12, will have experienced, abuse, neglect, military trauma, or an unidentified trauma related to chronic traumatic experiences over their lifetime. We will be partnering with 7 local Title 1 schools, with the goal of adding 2 schools by the end of the grant cycle. Real Life Heroes will be implemented through individual and family therapy. Organizationally, we will continue to implement TFCBT, CPP, PCIT, and the Sanctuary Model throughout the state, offering trainings in these EBPs to CHS Divisions throughout the state. Systematically, we will be engaging and leading a community-wide, cross-sector group that will identify and mobilize a holistic set of resources to aid children who have or at-risk of experiencing trauma. The group will also promote a community wide campaign in trauma awareness, using the resources of the NCTSN and a collaboration with a Category 2 site.

Location:
Pensacola , FL
Staff:

Children's Hospital Boston, Advancing Treatment and Services for Refugee Children and Adolescents

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II - Massachusetts
Funding Period:
2001-2005, 2007-2012, 2012-2016, 2016-2021

The Boston Children's Hospital Refugee Trauma and Resilience Center works to provide national expertise in the area of Refugee Displacement and War Zone Trauma/Refugee Health and Resettlement Agencies (Refugee Trauma). The purpose of this project is to address behavioral health disparities for refugee children, adolescents, and families across the nation by developing, disseminating, and supporting strategies that enhance access, service use, and outcomes for this population. The specific goals that comprise this work include: (1) supporting the development and implementation of effective trauma interventions and approaches for refugee children; (2) developing training protocols and products to support dissemination and replication of effective interventions and approaches in communities across the nation; (3) developing and disseminating evidence-supported products in refugee trauma; (4) developing and delivering trainings across systems and providers; (5) collaborating within the network to promote understanding of the culture and special needs of refugee children and families; and (6) providing national and community leadership on child refugee trauma.

Location:
Boston , MA
Staff:

Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron, A Regional Center of Excellence

Organizational Affiliate - Ohio
Funding Period:
2012-2016

Akron Children’s Hospital strives to raise awareness of the affect of traumatic stress and adversity on traumatized children and their families. This initiative will train medical health providers and staff on the physical and psychological consequences of experiencing adverse events and the importance of early identification. We will provide trainings to area school, juvenile justice, and child protective services staffs and to mental health providers in trauma-informed care. These trainings will help prepare our community to assess and treat traumatized children with evidence-based practices. We will also train those who work with traumatized children and families on ways to improve their resiliency through education on secondary traumatic stress. 

Location:
Akron , OH
Staff:

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia & Nemours/A.I DuPont Hospital for Children, Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress

Organizational Affiliate - Pennsylvania
Funding Period:
2002-2005, 2007-2012, 2012-2016

The Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress (CPTS) will continue to address health-related trauma in the lives of children and families. The center's mission is to reduce medical traumatic stress by promoting trauma-informed health care, by integrating practical evidence-based tools into pediatric medical care, and by ensuring that health care providers are knowledgeable and skilled in trauma-informed care for culturally diverse youth and their families. CPTS has developed and evaluated acute and brief family-focused interventions, which can be integrated within pediatric health care. The center’s four current goals are to: 1) engage and provide national expertise to health care providers and health care systems in improving outcomes for children and families with medical trauma; 2) adapt, disseminate, and provide training to mental health providers in trauma-informed assessments and interventions for children and families experiencing medical trauma; 3) ensure that children and families have access to evidence-based resources and interventions that address the impact of medical trauma; and 4) equip other child-serving systems with trauma-informed approaches to address injury, illness, and medical problems in children and families. Activities to achieve these goals include: promoting professional and public awareness of medical trauma via CPTS's active Web presence www.healthcaretoolbox.org (to reach 20,000 providers per year) and via CPTS’s partnership with national health provider organizations; supporting implementation of effective assessment and intervention for medical trauma in more than 100 health care settings; delivering training on and tools for assessment and intervention with medical trauma to more than 9,000 health and mental health providers; and disseminating trauma-focused resources in English and Spanish to children and families experiencing medical trauma.

Location:
Philadelphia , PA
Staff:

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