Current and Affiliated NCTSN Organizational Members

Below is a roster of organizational NCTSN members arranged by state. This list includes current grantees as well as affiliated members—former grantees who have maintained their ties to the Network. For each site the funding period(s) by Federal fiscal year, abstract, and contact information are listed. This roster will change as the funding status of these sites changes.

View a map (PDF) of Network members and affiliates.

To see a listing of individual affiliated professionals, click here.

Click here (PDF) for a complete listing of Network members by federal fiscal year. This listing includes current grantees, affiliates, and formerly funded sites that are no longer active in the Network.

To search for Network centers by state, select a state from the drop-down menu and click "Apply."

The Community Trauma Treatment Center for Runaway and Homeless Youth, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2005 - 2009]
Description: 

The Community Trauma Treatment Center for Runaway and Homeless Youth uses knowledge about trauma to transform service delivery to homeless youth ages 13-21 in the Hollywood community. This work includes the implementation of evidence- and practice-based clinical treatment; the development, implementation, and evaluation of trauma-informed services; and capacity-building activities directed at direct care and clinical staff. The Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is the lead agency and is collaborating with four community Agencies—Covenant House California, the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center, the Los Angeles Youth Network, and My Friend’s Place—and other agencies within the Hollywood Homeless Youth Partnership. In addition to the work done to improve local services for homeless youth, the Community Trauma Treatment Center for Runaway and Homeless Youth is developing products and training curricula (including web-based training) and is partnering with national technical assistance organizations to transform services for homeless youth nationally.

Contact: 
Arlene Schneir
Phone: 
(323) 361-3901

The Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families (The Delaware Children’s Department

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009]
Description: 

The Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families (The Delaware Children’s Department) is the state agency whose primary responsibility is to provide and manage a range of services for children who have experienced abandonment, abuse, adjudication, mental illness, neglect, or substance abuse. Its services include prevention, early intervention, assessment, treatment, permanency, and aftercare. The Children’s Department employs approximately 1,300 staff members at 31 locations, who serve over 8,000 children on any given day. The Department operates a trauma-informed system of care and has been the recipient of multiple systems of care and trauma-specific grants that it has used to increase effective screening, case management, and treatment services for children experiencing a range of behavioral health issues including traumatic stress.


The Children’s Department is made up of four divisions that include the Division of Prevention and Behavioral Health (home to the Office of Evidence-Based Practice), which collaborates locally with families, providers, school, and others to increase the system’s capacity to identify, assess and effectively treat children with traumatic stress (including Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy); the Division of Family Services, which investigates child abuse, neglect, and dependency, and offers treatment services, foster care, adoption, independent living, and child care licensing services; the Division of Youth Rehabilitative Services, which provides services including detention, treatment, probation, and aftercare services to youth in the State of Delaware who are ordered to its care by Family Court; and the Division of Management Support Services, which provides education to youth who are served in a range of residential and day treatment programs (both behavioral health and juvenile justice), and also provides administrative support, consultation, and technical support throughout the Department in critical areas such as human resources, information technology, facilities management, and a range of fiscal management services.

Contact: 
Aileen Fink, Ph.D.
Phone: 
(302) 633-2634

The Edmund Ervin Pediatric Center, Mid-Maine Child Trauma Network

Funding Period: 
[2002 - 2005]
Description: 
The Edmund N. Ervin Pediatric Center provides a number of services for children who have experienced traumatic stress and also identifies children who have experienced traumatic stress. The pediatric center has a comprehensive assessment program called PREP, which provides medical, developmental, mental health, and educational evaluations for children as they enter home placements from the child welfare system. A child psychologist and a general pediatrician perform this function annually with approximately 200 children from six counties in Maine. If the children are still in care six to eight months later, the pediatrician revisits them to ensure that their needs have been addressed and to help with permanency planning. In the behavioral medicine and developmental evaluation clinics, children are evaluated for hyperactivity, aggressive behavior, developmental delay, and autism. Speech, PT, medical, psychology, and social work staff screen children and families for adverse childhood experiences and history of trauma. The pediatric center serves over 400 children per year in these programs and frequently identifies significant parental mental health needs and child traumatic stress, and staff enact interventions to help these families. The Center is currently associated with a CAC that operates in the same building and has achieved full certification. In the work to help develop the CAC, the pediatric center staff identified a need for evidence-based evidentiary medical exams, and a state child abuse pediatrician, who is on the CAC’s board, visits the office once a month to provide this service. Dr. Stephen Meister is the Chair of the state child death and serious injury review panel and works closely with the DHHS Office of Child and Family Services in an advocacy role. Furthermore, he works closely with both the national and Maine chapters of the AAP in this area.
Contact: 
Stephen Meister
Phone: 
(207) 872-4163

The Family Center at Kennedy Krieger Institute

Funding Period: 
[2011 – 2012, 2007 – 2011, and 2003 - 2007]
Description: 
The Family Center is a program of Kennedy Krieger Institute, a Johns Hopkins University-affiliated specialty hospital internationally recognized for improving the lives of children and adolescents with pediatric developmental disabilities and disorders of the brain, spinal cord and musculoskeletal system, through patient care, special education, research, and professional training. Located in an urban community in Baltimore, the Family Center provides high-quality, culturally sensitive, comprehensive clinical programs and community-based services for children and families who experience or may be at risk for trauma related to maltreatment and exposure to violence. The Center offers a range of evidence-based and trauma-informed services, including prevention, treatment, specialized foster care, community outreach, advocacy, research and training through four main programs and services: Outpatient Mental Health Program, Therapeutic Foster Care Program, Early Head Start, and the Trauma Training Academy. The Outpatient Mental Health Program is a winner of one of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse & Mental Health Service Administration's (SAMHSA) 2009 Science and Service Awards in the category of"Treatment of Mental Illness and Recovery Support Services" for its implementation of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy. Since its participation in the NCTSN, the Family Center is dedicated to providing quality clinical services using evidence-based and evidence-informed assessment and treatment practices. As an affiliate member, the Center remains involved with NCTSN activities focused on child sexual and physical abuse, complex trauma, trauma and substance abuse, early childhood trauma, traumatic experiences on parents, trauma-informed child welfare practices, secondary traumatic stress, cultural competence, family systems, policy and partnering with youth and families.
Contact: 
Elizabeth Thompson
Phone: 
(443) 923-5918

The Safe Mothers Safe Children (SMSC), New York University Lagoon School of Medicine: Child Trauma Institute

Funding Period: 
[2007-2012]
Description: 

The Safe Mothers Safe Children (SMSC) initiative seeks to reduce the risk of repeat child maltreatment through a multi-pronged intervention that enhances the identification, case management, and treatment of mothers receiving preventive services for trauma-related disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. The intervention is designed to treat PTSD and depression and foster positive parenting as a means of reducing child maltreatment and enhancing maternal and child well-being. The treatment is delivered at partner agencies’ sites and consists of 23 sessions. In addition, the SMSC initiative aims to help preventive agencies identify traumatized mothers who are at risk for repeat maltreatment and/or foster care placement; improve access to mental health services for mothers at high risk; increase caseworker knowledge of trauma and its impact on parenting and child maltreatment; increase caseworkers’ knowledge of early childhood needs and resources; develop caseworkers’ engagement skills with traumatized clients; and improve preventive agency practice.

Contact: 
Roni Avinadav
Phone: 
(646) 754-4815

Uniformed Services University, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The challenges of military children and families are substantial and require greater understanding, education, and services than they are currently receiving. Some of the most severe experiences that military children face are related to wartime stress: specifically, deployment of military parents to combat, parental injury or illness, or parental death. Little if any data exist in many of these areas. The Uniformed Services University Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress (USU CSTS) Child and Family Program is responsible for developing knowledge related to military childhood experiences, developing effective public education materials, and expanding and studying effective intervention strategies, all using a strength-based approach.

Though USU CSTS does not receive funding from SAMHSA, it functions as a Treatment and Services Adaptation Center within the NCTSN. The center serves as a consultant to the Network, acts as a knowledge development and dissemination center, and creates trauma-focused products specific to military families.

Contact: 
Stephen Cozza
Phone: 
(301) 295-2470
Email: 

University of Arkansas Medical SCIS, Little Rock, The Arkansas Network for Early Stress and Trauma (NEST)

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Arkansas Network for Early Stress and Trauma (NEST) will: 1) provide culturally competent, client-centered, family-focused, evidence-based assessment and treatment—including Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP)—to 340 traumatized children aged 0–5 referred by child welfare professionals, early childhood educators, military partners and/or child advocates; 2) train, coach, and monitor fidelity in at least 70 mental health professionals to implement evidence-based interventions targeting young children; and 3) develop training materials, resource kits, and other tools to enhance trauma-informed practices for children aged 0–5 in court, child welfare, child advocacy, early childhood education, veteran, and military systems.

Contact: 
Benjamin Sigel
Phone: 
(501) 364-1592
Email: 

University of California, Davis, UC Davis - PCIT Training Center

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The UC Davis–PCIT Training Center project will further the dissemination of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) by developing and testing a web course (PCITWeb) designed to inform professionals who may want to acquire and/or enhance PCIT skill involvement. The center will also develop a Learning Collaborative that focuses on the use of PCIT with young traumatized children and their families, and will create several products to enhance and support clinicians’ use of PCIT in a broad range of settings (e.g., community mental health centers, private practice, and in-home services). Three pathways will be used to disseminate knowledge and skills related to the application of PCIT: 1) the creation of a 10-hour culturally competent web course for mental health providers who serve traumatized children and their families; 2) enrollment of 10 agencies in PCIT Competency Achievement Training to deliver PCIT services and train staff at these agencies to use the 10-hour web courses in their communities; and 3) development of PCIT products that will support the effective use of PCIT. These objectives will be achieved through extensive collaboration with NCTSN members, and will include formation of a PCIT Learning Collaborative, a PCIT Workgroup, and a PCIT Family Consumer group.
Contact: 
Anthony Urquiza
Phone: 
(916) 734-7833

University of California, San Francisco, Early Trauma Treatment Network

Funding Period: 
[2012 -2016, 2009 - 2012, 2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 
The Early Trauma Treatment Network (ETTN): Raising the Standard of Care for Young Children 0–5 will address the needs of traumatized young children and preschoolers by raising their standard of care and by enabling increased access to evidence-based trauma treatment for them. ETTN will work to build early trauma competence in the systems serving these children. Statistically, young children and preschoolers have a higher exposure to trauma; and they are the most defenseless due to developmental vulnerability, and dependency on parents and/or caregivers. ETTN will: 1) address training and service gaps by engaging in activities that promote workforce development; 2) create culturally competent products, resources, and training protocols; and 3) build mechanisms for collaboration across the mental health, pediatric care, early childhood education, early intervention, child welfare, judicial, and military systems. ETTN is a collaborative of four national programs. All ETTN sites will provide training in Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), a manualized, evidence-based intervention for young children. To improve access to services and to raise the standard of care for traumatized young children and preschoolers, ETTN will build training infrastructure and conduct five Learning Collaboratives with NCTSN Centers and community-based programs—focusing on American Indian providers, military family providers, distance learning technologies, Train-the-Trainer Learning Collaboratives to increase CPP capacity in training and supervision, and national Learning Collaboratives with tracks for Spanish-speaking providers. Additionally, ETTN will create educational and training materials for parents, childcare providers, and service providers for military families; and will collaborate with the NCCTS and with NCTSN Centers in cross-site evaluation, training, and dissemination. Over the course of the grant, ETTN will provide training related to early childhood trauma to 40,000+ service providers and CPP training to a minimum of 480 mental health practitioners.
Contact: 
Alicia Lieberman
Phone: 
(415) 206-5979

University of Colorado Denver, Kempe Evidence-Based Mental Health Initiative

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The Kempe Evidence-Based Mental Health Initiative will be developed by the Kempe Imhoff Clinic, which provides mental health services to trauma-exposed children and families referred from several community sites. Project goals include: 1) continuing clinical services at the clinic and expanding the evidence-based treatments (EBTs) offered by clinical staff, e.g., Alternatives for Families­A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT); 2) increasing capacity of the clinic’s military partners to identify children and families in need of mental health services, and developing specialty services for military families in the clinic; and 3) expanding the Colorado Evidence-Based Training Initiative to train mental health professionals (civilian and military) and child welfare professionals in trauma-informed, evidence-based treatment. The program expects to provide mental health services to 1,540 children/families and training to 760 professionals throughout the Western Mountain region.

Contact: 
Kimberly Shipman
Phone: 
(303) 864-5366