Current and Affiliated NCTSN Organizational Members

Below is a roster of organizational NCTSN members arranged by state. This list includes current grantees as well as affiliated members—former grantees who have maintained their ties to the Network. For each site the funding period(s) by Federal fiscal year, abstract, and contact information are listed. This roster will change as the funding status of these sites changes.

View a map (PDF) of Network members and affiliates.

To see a listing of individual affiliated professionals, click here.

Click here (PDF) for a complete listing of Network members by federal fiscal year. This listing includes current grantees, affiliates, and formerly funded sites that are no longer active in the Network.

To search for Network centers by state, select a state from the drop-down menu and click "Apply."

Parsons Child and Family Center, Heroes Project

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 
Parsons Child and Family Center’s Sidney Albert Training and Research Institute (SATRI) has provided training, consultation, and research as a NCTSN Community Practice sSite since 2002, including national and regional leadership in developing and disseminating evidence-supported trauma and resiliency-focused services for children and families with traumatic stress. The HEROES Project, a SAMHSA-funded NCTSN grant, provided integrated trauma-informed training for six programs at Parsons, the Albany County Children’s Mental Health Clinic, and the Albany County Department of Children, Youth and Families from 2009-2012. The Project trained therapists, foster parents, residential counselors, child protective services workers, and educators, and evaluated of the efficacy of Real Life Heroes (RLH), a trauma and resiliency-focused treatment, to help children and families who had experienced multiple and interpersonal traumas such as emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, domestic violence, losses, or community violence. Results of HEROES Project research are being published in a journal of the American Psychological Association and include statistically significant decreases in child behavior problems and trauma symptoms. The study supported the efficacy of implementing trauma and resiliency-focused treatment in a wide range of child welfare and children’s mental health programs. Following Parsons’ affiliation with the Northeast Parent and Child Society in 2012, the scope of SATRI training and consultation has more than doubled. The combined agencies currently serve more than 12,000 children and family members each year in 46 counties of New York State with 60 programs and over 1,200 staff. Primary service areas include: eEarly cChildhood, eEducation, tTraining and& rResearch, bBehavioral hHealth, fFamily fFoster cCare, rResidential cCare, cCase mManagement, pPrevention and& fFamily pPreservation, and cCareer dDevelopment. As a NCTSN affiliate organizations, the two agencies have continued Parsons’ commitment to “‘learning, adapting, creating, and delivering the most effective services for children and families.”’ In the last two years (2012-2014), Parsons’ sStaff have led, or co-led 13 workshops or presentations at national and regional conferences, and co-authored two articles in peer-reviewed journals and one chapter in a highly regarded book on the treatment of complex trauma in children and adolescents. Training programs, research, and publications continue Parsons’ commitment over the last 12 years to collaborative work with other NCTSN colleagues on disseminating evidence-supported trauma treatment. This has included participation in the NCTSN Affiliate Advisory Group, the Complex Trauma and Integrated Health Care committees, and co-leadership of the NCTSN Resource Parent Workgroup, which developed a highly regarded trauma-informed training used by foster, kinship, and adoptive parents across the United States. Training in Real Life Heroes, the Resource Parent Curriculum, and consultation on implementation of trauma-informed treatment in child welfare and children’s behavioral health programs are available through the Parsons SATRI.
Contact: 
Richard Kagan
Phone: 
(518) 426-2600

Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health/MR Services, Philadelphia Alliance for Child Trauma Services

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Philadelphia Alliance for Child Trauma Services (PACTS) will increase the number of youth served who have experienced trauma and who receive evidence-based interventions for their symptoms. Objectives include: 1) increasing screening for traumatic stress symptoms in child-serving programs such as pediatric emergency departments, primary care clinics, juvenile court, and child welfare sites; 2) providing trauma-informed clinical assessments at child and adolescent behavioral health programs; 3) developing a coordinated network of service providers for expeditious referral of children and families; 4) offering early posttraumatic intervention using the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI) to help prevent the development of PTSD; and 5) providing TF-CBT for children and adolescents who have full or partial PTSD with co-morbid disorders and difficulties. The center will increase the number of youth and families served each year, totaling 2,118 during the lifetime of the project.

Contact: 
Kamilah Jackson
Phone: 
(215) 685-4751

Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, The Chadwick Trauma-Informed Systems Dissemination and Implementation Project

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2010 - 2013, 2005 - 2009 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 

The Chadwick Trauma-Informed Systems Dissemination and Implementation Project (CTISP-DI) will be created by the Chadwick Center for Children and Families and the Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC) to meet the needs of child abuse victims served by Child Protective Services and Child Welfare (CW) services across the nation. The center—in cooperation with the NCCTS, other select US Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Centers and Community Treatment and Services (CTS) Centers, NCTSN committees, and CW and mental health organizations providing trauma treatment nationwide—will lead the transformation of public CW agencies into trauma-informed systems. CTISP-DI will translate the Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Conceptual Framework developed by CTISP into a systems-level intervention   with multiple components including training, consultation, and ongoing support using the Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice Toolkit and the revised version of the Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit (also developed as part of CTISP), among other tools. The CTISP-DI Trauma-Informed Child Welfare System Intervention will be disseminated to at least six CW systems in the United States to help them become supercommunities that fully implement the intervention at a true performance level. These evolved, trauma-informed CW systems will then reach thousands of children and families, and will serve as exemplars for their states and the nation while helping to lead the movement to true trauma-informed practice. The CTISP-DI will help to change the wider community CW system into a multidimensional, evidence-based, trauma-informed system that is better able to meet the unique needs of children and families involved in the CW system.

Contact: 
Charles Wilson
Phone: 
(858) 966-5814

Safe Horizon, Inc., Center for Child Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 
The Center for Child Traumatic Stress (CCTS) will adapt, disseminate, implement, and sustain culturally competent, trauma-focused, evidence-based treatment services for children at multiple points in the posttraumatic trajectory. A range of treatments will be provided at Safe Horizon's diverse child service settings throughout New York City including acute and early interventions, and longer-term treatments for more chronic PTSD. During the four years of this project, CCTS expects to serve approximately 28,200 youth.
Contact: 
Victoria Dexter
Phone: 
(347) 328-8031

Serving Children and Adolescents in Need (S.C.A.N.), Border Traumatic Stress Response (Border TSR)

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2005 - 2009]
Description: 
The Border Traumatic Stress Resource Center (BTSRC), a project under Serving Children and Adults in Need Inc. (SCAN) is an affiliate site of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. BTSRC focuses on: 1) enhancing the skills of its workforce to use a trauma lens in everything they do; 2) utilizing trauma-specific interventions that are evidence-based; 3) developing services that concurrently treat traumatic stress and substance abuse; 4) partnering with other organizations around the country to advance services and resources for children and families impacted by trauma; and 5) serving as an information clearinghouse for NCTSN products and training resources for professionals and organizations in Webb County and surrounding areas that desire to become more knowledgeable about trauma-informed care and adept at delivering trauma-informed services.
Contact: 
Luis E. Flores
Phone: 
(956) 724-3177 ext 156

Sisters of Mercy Ministries, Project Fleur de lis

Funding Period: 
[ 2012 - 2016 and 2008 - 2012]
Description: 
Project Fleur-de-lis will expand its trauma-informed services to schools serving military youth and families in the Greater New Orleans area, home to the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans and Federal City. The program will provide the following interventions to youth in schools: 1) Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS), 2) Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS), and 3) Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). An expected 19,285 individuals will be served during the grant period. For Mercy Center and Project Fleur de lis on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mercyneworleans https://twitter.com/MercyPFDL
Contact: 
Laura Danna
Phone: 
1-888-950-0003

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS) develops, adapts, and disseminates trauma-focused assessment and treatment services for traumatized children and adults, with special emphasis on those from low-income and racially diverse neighborhoods who have been exposed to interpersonal and community violence, and who present with the consequences of both acute and chronic traumatic stress.

The Center helps to build the evidence base for promising treatments for trauma in collaboration with other NCTSN member sites, as well as with JBFCS programs. It works to build the capacity of organizations to provide best practice in assessing and treating trauma through training, implementation, and consultation on evidence-based practices. Working with the New York City mental health, child welfare, and educational systems, the Center enhances the ability of professionals within these systems to provide trauma-informed services to the city’s children, and reaches out to businesses and community organizations to provide training in psychological first aid, active coping, and crisis intervention.

JBFCS, an affiliate member of the NCTSN, has been focusing on sustaining evidence-based practice since their renewal grant ended in 2009. Sustainability has been challenging in this fiscal climate and JBFCS has relied on the expertise gained through their involvement with the NCTSN in implementing and sustaining practice in community settings. JBFCS has been able to expand the Sanctuary model to five programs including residential treatment, group home, and domestic violence shelters serving over 1,600 youth and families since 2008. The use of evidence-based practice has also grown from the original implementation of STAIR and Life Skills/ Life Stories to include TFCBT, CPP, SPARCS, and AFCBT in use in 16 programs system wide with over 200 clinicians trained. We have provided crisis interventions to 35 community programs, including schools, synagogues, and community mental health programs reaching over 500 individuals, to help stabilize systems following a critical incident. We have also trained 112 professionals and community members in psychological first aid in order to further create crisis response capacity within the community.

Contact: 
Christina Grosso
Phone: 
(212) 632-4698

The Child and Adolescent Fear and Anxiety Treatment Program at the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders at Boston University

Funding Period: 
[2003 - 2007]
Description: 

The Child and Adolescent Fear and Anxiety Treatment Program at the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders at Boston University offers clinical services to young people experiencing difficulty with fears, anxiety, shyness, and other related disorders such as depression and traumatic stress. It also offers specialty programs for preschool-aged children with disruptive behavior problems.

The program provides comprehensive evaluations and state-of-the-art cognitive-behavioral treatment for children and adolescents between the ages of three and 17. For certain child populations and disorders, the program provides behavioral parent training as well as live and interactive Internet-based services delivered directly to the homes of families struggling with difficult preschoolers.  
 

Contact: 
Donna Pincus
Phone: 
(617) 353-9315
Email: 

The Children Who Witness Violence Program, Mental Health Services for Homeless Persons

Funding Period: 
[2002 - 2005 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The Children Who Witness Violence Program’s Violent Loss Response Team (VLRT) is a program of Frontline Service, Inc. that provides a crisis response and intensive case management services for children and families affected by homicide in the City of Cleveland.

VLRT is a partnership between the Cleveland Division of Police, MHS, and the Cuyahoga County Victim Witness Program. VLRT staff members provide comprehensive practical and emotional supportive services to family members of homicide victims. They work with families providing onsite crisis intervention and grief counseling, followed by intensive case management services that includes assistance food, shelter, and transportation; help with making funeral arrangements; applying for Victims of Crime Compensation; assistance with estate issues; applying for and accessing death benefits and life insurance; and helping to facilitating custody filings for children, if necessary. If families need ongoing care, VLRT provides mental health assessments and therapeutic services.

The Homicide Unit of the Cleveland Police Department makes referrals to VLRT by contacting the Frontline Service 24-hour crisis hotline. Staff provides a rapid response, usually within 24 hours, to engage the family in services. VLRT also works with the Witness Victim Center to help families navigate the criminal justice system and understand their legal rights. VLRT is available to the community 24/7.

The program’s original funding came from the Office of Victims of Crime of the U.S. Department of Justice in 2009, which enabled MHS and its partners to develop and deliver a best-practice model for families of homicide victims.

VLRT’s model has demonstrated success in addressing the immediate and emergent needs of families affected by traumatic loss. The community’s response has been overwhelmingly favorable, including requests to replicate the program.

The Police Assisted Referral Program was initiated on January 1, 2010. The project was designed to provide first responders with access to a trauma-informed mental health intervention that would address the domestic violence victims they encounter when responding to calls in public housing. CMHAPD makes referrals to the Crisis Hotline and information is relayed to clinical staff. At that time the PAR staff are notified of a new referral, and outreach attempts begin immediately. Some of the child services may include crisis intervention, trauma-informed diagnostic assessments, referrals and linkage to services, along with domestic violence advocacy and support services for the victim.

 

Contact: 
Rosemary Creeden
Phone: 
(216) 274-3566

The Children's Center, Trauma Program for Families and Young Children

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2009-2012]
Description: 
The Trauma Program for Families with Young Children will provide evidence-based trauma treatments to children aged 0–8 living in four metropolitan counties (Salt Lake, Davis, Utah, and Weber). Participants in the program will include children who have suffered trauma (including sexual, physical abuse, or neglect, and witnessing severe domestic violence) or traumatic grief. A specific focus will be on military children suffering from grief or from the return of an impaired parent/caregiver; other populations will include refugee children suffering from the loss of their home and extended family members, and children in domestic violence shelters. During the four-year program, approximately 6,000 children will be screened for trauma; and of those screened, 3,000 will receive trauma-informed mental health assessments. Additionally, 240 military children will be treated. By the end of the grant, 420 children and families will receive evidence-based trauma treatment.
Contact: 
Dough Goldsmith
Phone: 
(801) 582-5534