Current and Affiliated NCTSN Organizational Members

Below is an alphabetical listing of NCTSN member organizations. This list includes current grantees as well as NCTSN Affiliates—former grantees who have maintained their ties to the Network. For each organization, the funding period(s) by Federal fiscal year, program description, and contact information are listed.

Download a complete roster of NCTSN current grantee centers.

View a map (PDF) of Network members and Affiliates.

To see a listing of individual Affiliated professionals, click here.

Click here (PDF) for a complete listing of Network members by federal fiscal year. This listing includes current grantees, affiliates, and formerly funded sites that are no longer active in the Network.

To search for Network centers by state, select a state from the drop-down menu and click "Apply."

The Family Peace Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
Description: 

The Family PEACE (Preventing Early Adverse Childhood Experiences) Trauma Treatment Center (FPTTC) is an outpatient mental health service at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center. The FPTTC provides services to young children and caregivers who have been exposed to traumatic violence and abuse. The FPTTC provides Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) for children ages 0-5 and their caregivers as well as adjunctive individual treatment for caregivers, and Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency (ARC) for the 6-10 year-old siblings of 0-5 year-old referred children. The FPTTC additionally provides trainings for community partner organizations on the impact of trauma on young children and for hospital medical staff on how to effectively screen for Intimate Partner Violence within the primary care setting. The current project develops a model co-location program to place Spanish-speaking, trauma and CPP-trained early childhood psychologists into NYP pediatric primary care clinics and community based organizations with the goals of: implementing screening protocols to increase early identification of trauma-exposed children ages 0-5; improving access to developmentally appropriate, linguistically competent, and evidence-based trauma treatment; and developing a trauma-informed system of care through the training of pediatric medical residents, primary care staff, and collaborating community organizations. The project additionally pilots a model of supportive programming that is Spanish-language, culturally informed, and culturally proficient in order to enhance treatment outcomes for bicultural Latino families affected by traumatic events.

City, State: 
New York, NY
Contact: 
Erica Willheim
Phone: 
(646) 317-5593
Email: 

The Family Place: Child and Family Support Center of Cache County

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
Description: 

Through our Trauma Resiliency Project, the Family Place serves children ages 0-11 who have experienced trauma and their families using the Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency (ARC) framework developed at the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute. We implement the ARC framework through three modalities: a therapeutic child center, home visits, and group therapy. Our project serves those living in Cache and Rich Counties, Utah, with a particular focus on military families and refugee families. The Family Place also collaborates with and trains key community partners including Family Support Centers, child welfare agencies, schools, and other agencies that have a focus on human services. The Family Place operates out of three centers located in northern Utah.

City, State: 
Logan, UT
Contact: 
Manuel Zizumbo
Phone: 
(435) 752-8880

The Safe Mothers Safe Children (SMSC), New York University Lagoon School of Medicine: Child Trauma Institute

Funding Period: 
[2007-2012]
Description: 

The Safe Mothers Safe Children (SMSC) initiative seeks to reduce the risk of repeat child maltreatment through a multi-pronged intervention that enhances the identification, case management, and treatment of mothers receiving preventive services for trauma-related disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. The intervention is designed to treat PTSD and depression and foster positive parenting as a means of reducing child maltreatment and enhancing maternal and child well-being. The treatment is delivered at partner agencies’ sites and consists of 23 sessions. In addition, the SMSC initiative aims to help preventive agencies identify traumatized mothers who are at risk for repeat maltreatment and/or foster care placement; improve access to mental health services for mothers at high risk; increase caseworker knowledge of trauma and its impact on parenting and child maltreatment; increase caseworkers’ knowledge of early childhood needs and resources; develop caseworkers’ engagement skills with traumatized clients; and improve preventive agency practice.

City, State: 
New York, NY
Contact: 
Roni Avinadav
Phone: 
(646) 754-4815

The Trauma-Informed Juvenile Justice Program

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021 and 2012-2016]
Description: 

The Trauma-informed Juvenile Justice Program is a Category III (community practice) center of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network based at Bellevue Hospital Center. Funded by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and partnered with the New York Office of Children’s Services (OCS) and the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH), our program focuses on improving the quality of care in juvenile justice facilities in New York City and State and, eventually across the United States.

Youth in the juvenile justice system have very high rates of trauma exposure and, sometimes, this trauma exposure is expressed in the violent behavior for which children were adjudicated. The Trauma-informed Juvenile Justice Program aims to address this serious problem by providing the following to detention facilities in the juvenile justice system:

  • High quality screening tools to identify a child’s trauma history and its impact on his or her functioning. 
  • Training programs for correction officers in detention facilities so that they may be best equipped to help the youth in their facilities. 
  • Intervention programs to address the traumatic stress problems of youth who reside in detention facilities 
  • Consultation programs to help administrators of detention facilities best organize and manage their program to address the needs of traumatized children in their facilities 
  • Legal advocacy programs to educate judges and others in the legal system about the relationship between violent behavior and traumatic stress in some children who commit crimes.

 

City, State: 
New York, NY
Contact: 
Michael Surko
Phone: 
(929) 888-6795
Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
City, State: 
Sacramento, CA
Contact: 
Susan Timmer

Trauma and Grief Program at the University of Michigan

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The primary mission of the University of Michigan Department of Psychiatry's Trauma and Grief program is to raise the standard of care and increase access to best-practice care for traumatized and/or grieving children and families (see http://www.psych.med.umich.edu/patient-care/trauma-and-grief-center/). We are affiliates with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.

Trauma and Grief Clinic
The Trauma and Grief Clinic provides trauma informed assessment, intervention, consultation and community outreach to children, adolescents (between the ages of 7-17 years) and families who anticipate or have significant histories of traumatic- and/or grief-exposed circumstances, broadly defined, to promote understanding of responses and healing. To service this population with a best practices approach that is individually tailored keeping in mind developmental, cultural, and other diversity considerations.

Infant and Early Childhood Clinic
The Infant and Early Childhood Clinic (see also http://www.psych.med.umich.edu/patient-care/infant-and-early-childhood-clinic/) provides assessment and intervention services to infants, toddlers, young children (birth-6) and their families.  We aim to promote the healing and resilience of young children and their families who have experienced trauma and/or loss through use of individually-tailored best-practices that include trauma- and developmentally-informed assessment, consultation, and intervention services. In addition, our clinic provides community consultation, advanced training to professionals, and engages in research focused on better understanding and meeting the needs of young children and their families.  The Infant and Early Childhood program also includes multifamily group services for families impacted by toxic stress, adversity, and trauma; these include military families with young children (Strong Military Families; Rosenblum & Muzik, 2014; see also http://m-span.org/programs-for-military-families/strong-families/) as well as mothers with trauma histories parenting young children (Mom Power; Muzik, Rosenblum et al., 2015).
 

City, State: 
Ann Arbor, MI
Contact: 
Katherine Rosenblum
Phone: 
(734) 764-0231

Uniformed Services University, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The challenges of military children and families are substantial and require greater understanding, education, and services than they are currently receiving. Some of the most severe experiences that military children face are related to wartime stress: specifically, deployment of military parents to combat, parental injury or illness, or parental death. Little if any data exist in many of these areas. The Uniformed Services University Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress (USU CSTS) Child and Family Program is responsible for developing knowledge related to military childhood experiences, developing effective public education materials, and expanding and studying effective intervention strategies, all using a strength-based approach.

Though USU CSTS does not receive funding from SAMHSA, it functions as a Treatment and Services Adaptation Center within the NCTSN. The center serves as a consultant to the Network, acts as a knowledge development and dissemination center, and creates trauma-focused products specific to military families.

City, State: 
Bethesda, MD
Contact: 
Stephen Cozza
Phone: 
(301) 295-2470
Email: 

University of Arkansas Medical SCIS, Little Rock, The Arkansas Network for Early Stress and Trauma (NEST)

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The mission of Arkansas Building Effective Services for Trauma (ARBEST) is to improve outcomes for children who have experienced trauma and their families through excellence in clinical care, training, advocacy, and research & evaluation. ARBEST operates under the auspices of the Psychiatric Research Institute of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. ARBEST focuses on building capacity in our state’s Child Advocacy Centers by supporting their mental health programs, through our Community Mental Health Centers by training licensed mental health professionals in evidence-based treatments for children (i.e. TF-CBT, PCIT, and CPP), and with our child welfare agencies by offering trauma-informed practiced trainings to their supervisors and frontline staff.

City, State: 
Little Rock, AR
Contact: 
Chad Sievers, MSSW
Phone: 
(501) 526-8317

University of California, Davis, UC Davis - PCIT Training Center

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The Child and Adolescent Abuse Resource and Evaluation Center (CAARE) at UC Davis Children’s Hospital provides services to children and adolescents and their families in Sacramento, California who have been exposed to trauma, providing culturally informed, evidence-based, developmentally appropriate services. For this project, the CAARE Center will collaborate with Sacramento County Child Protective Services and Sacramento County Behavioral Health Services to support newly placed foster children’s transition to their new home. Infant Mental Health therapists at the CAARE Center will conduct trauma screenings of 1 – 5 year old foster children just entering foster care and provide PC-CARE—a brief, 6-week behaviorally-oriented, skills-based parenting intervention. Trauma screenings of foster children entering care and teaching foster parents about trauma symptoms is hypothesized to help connect traumatized children to mental health services more quickly. Teaching and coaching foster parents positive parenting skills as they play with the child, is hypothesized to support the developing relationship between the caregiver and child, and provide caregivers strategies for effective behavior management, thus promoting placement stability. In addition to trauma screening and providing a brief, preventive intervention, the CAARE Center team will give presentations to stakeholders (such as foster family associations, county foster parents) on the effects of trauma on young children’s behavior and mental health and the value of positive parenting.
City, State: 
Sacramento, CA
Contact: 
Susan G. Timmer
Phone: 
(916) 734-6630

University of California, Los Angeles (Asarnow)

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
Description: 

The UCLA-Duke Adolescent Suicide/Self Harm & Substance Abuse Prevention (ASAP) will serve as a resource for information related to safety, suicidal/self-harm behaviors, and substance use among trauma-exposed youths. We prioritize services for emergency/acute care and brief time-limited treatments, adapting for the trauma-exposed population and then disseminating two brief evidence-based interventions for suicide/self-harm risk (Emergency/Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention; SAFETY) and two for substance abuse (Screening/Motivational Interviewing(MI); CBT with MI/optional contingency management). To inform and develop optimal service strategies for improving outcomes for trauma-exposed youths, the Center will also work to develop and strengthen trauma informed care that integrates care for adolescent behavioral health within primary care, emergency, and other medical settings, as well as other mental health, school, and community settings. We will utilize surveillance data on suicide/self-harm and substance abuse risk in the NCTSN population to guide this work. Intervention training and dissemination will include technology-enhanced tools/materials and data-informed supervision systems and clinical dashboards to enhance quality of care and client outcomes. Through trainings/dissemination activities, the Center aims to serve diverse youths, across racial and ethnic groups. sexual identities and orientations, socioeconomic groups, and address needs of youths in military families. Our Center goal is to support providers and service systems in addressing safety issues and substance misuse effectively, thereby enhancing the benefits of other treatments that specifically target post-traumatic stress disorders/reactions.

City, State: 
Los Angeles, CA
Contact: 
Joan R. Asarnow
Phone: 
(310) 454-2018