National Brain Injury Awareness Month (March 2014)

03/2014

According to the Brain Injury Association of America, each year an estimated 1.7 million children and adults in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and another 795,000 individuals sustain an acquired brain injury (ABI) from nontraumatic causes. TBIs can affect the functionality of the brain—affecting thinking, reasoning, and memory. Whether the victim is an adult, a child, or an infant, TBIs can have a major impact on individuals and their families.

To raise awareness of traumatic brain injury, the Brain Injury Association of America recognizes National Brain Injury Awareness Month every March. The NCTSN offers the following resources on traumatic brain injury for families, medical professionals, and military families.

 

Page Contents:

For Families

BrainFacts.org 
Website provides information on the field of neuroscience’s “understanding of causes, symptoms, and outcomes of brain disorders . . . shares the excitement of scientific discovery and educates about the scientific process.” Additional sections are designed for educators, the media, and policymakers.

Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA)
Organization works “to advance brain injury prevention, research, treatment and education, and to improve the quality of life for all individuals impacted by brain injury.” 

  • A Physician Talks About Severe Brain Injury: The Basics (2007) (PDF)
    Booklet offers information that helps individuals who have brain injuries—and their families, caregivers, and friends—understand and deal with the effects and outcomes of a serious brain injury. Includes additional resources on the topic.
  • Brothers and Sisters: Brain Injury Is a Family Affair (PDF)
    Article discusses common reactions siblings have toward a brother or sister who suffers a TBI. Offers suggestions to parents on how to help their other children deal with the effects of TBI including what to say, activities to share, literature to read, and support groups. The article was partly informed by interviews with families who have a TBI member. 
  • Challenges, Changes, and Choices: A Brain Injury Guide for Families and Caregivers
    Booklet provides information on the nature and consequences of brain injury. Features practical suggestions for families and caregivers on making decisions, helping family members, and enlisting the support of others. Also includes tips on how parents/caregivers can take care of themselves; and information on contacting recovery professionals, hospital stays, and rehabilitation. Includes links to other resources. The booklet may also be appropriate for individuals with mild brain injury.

Brain Injury Guide & Resources
Website offers information and resources for coping with and understanding TBI. Includes how the brain works; differences in TBI-related issues in children, older persons, and veterans; treatment options; and health care providers who offer services for persons with TBI.

BrainLine.org
Organization seeks to “provide a sense of community, a place where people who care about TBI can go 24 hours a day for information, support, and ideas.” Website features information and resources about preventing, treating, and living with TBI.

CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Center for research and education (located at McMaster University in Canada) focuses on improving the lives of children and youth with disabilities and their families.  

  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion) Education
    Webpage on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) / concussion includes brochures providing guidelines for determining when to allow children with concussion to safely return to activity and to school. Offers links to other resources.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Children’s Safety Network 
Center “for the prevention of childhood injuries and violence [offers] expertise on a wide range of injury topics.” Website includes resources for advocacy, materials development, training, technical assistance, needs assessment, and evaluation.

  • Traumatic Brain Injuries
    Webpage provides definition and signs of TBI; tips for parents and teachers on helping children with TBI and where to find help (including free evaluations); and links to other resources.

Shaken Baby Alliance
Organization provides information on shaken baby syndrome (SBA)—which can cause brain injury—and offers support and resources for families of victims of SBA and others affected by this form of child abuse. Website includes description of SBA and Abusive Head Trauma (AHT), and prevention and awareness tools.

  • Crying Plan (PDF)
    Printable page that parents/caregivers can fill out with a list of reminders about how to deal with an inconsolable crying infant. Also includes space to list names and phone numbers of people they can contact if their frustration becomes intolerable.

Traumatic Brain Injury
Website provides information for patients, family members, and caregivers on TBI. Topics include types and symptoms of brain injury, TBI treatment and recovery, and insights about the potential long-term effects of brain injury. Animation is used to help patients understand the brain and the results of injuries to different parts of the brain. Includes personal stories of TBI victims and a resource center.

The University of Alabama at Birmingham Traumatic Brain Injury Model System (UAB-TBIMS) Information Network 
Network serves as a resource to promote knowledge in research, health, and quality of life for people with traumatic brain injuries, their families, and TBI-related professionals. Includes educational materials and information on research activities of the UAB-TBIMS, other research resources, professional and consumer groups, and Spanish language information.

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For Medical Professionals

Brain Injury Guide and Resources
Website offers information and resources for coping with and understanding TBI. Includes how the brain works; differences in TBI-related issues in children, older persons, and veterans; treatment options; and links to health care providers who offer services for persons with TBI. Offers CE credits for health professionals.

Brain Trauma Foundation 
Organization works to improve “TBI patient outcomes worldwide by developing best practice guidelines, conducting clinical research, and educating medical professionals and consumers.” Website includes guidelines for management of TBI: prehospitial, severe, surgical, acute medical, and field; and information on early indicators.

CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Center for research and education (located at McMaster University in Canada) focuses on improving the lives of children and youth with disabilities and their families.  

  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion) Education
    Webpage on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) / concussion includes brochures providing guidelines for determining when to allow children with concussion to safely return to activity and to school. Offers links to other resources.

Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center 
Center serves active duty military, their beneficiaries, and veterans with traumatic brain injuries through state-of-the-art clinical care, innovative clinical research initiatives and educational programs, and support for health protection services. Website includes information for medical providers including TBI fact sheets, access to free online education (some of which enables CE credits), medical evacuation information, and other educational materials. 

Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury
Centers improve the lives of US “service members, families and veterans by advancing excellence in psychological health and traumatic brain injury prevention and care.” Website includes “tips, resources and educational information for civilian health care professionals about TBI and PTSD and how to approach military patients.”

MIRECC
Centers, which were established by Congress, research causes and treatments of mental disorders, and use education to put new knowledge into routine clinical practice at the Veterans Administration.

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For Military Families

BrainLinemilitary.org
Organization provides military-specific information and resources on traumatic brain injury to veterans, service members, and their families. Includes “brain injury symptoms and treatment, rehabilitation, and family issues associated with TBI care and recovery.” Provides “a sense of community, a place where people who care about TBI can go 24 hours a day for information, support, and ideas.”

Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress

Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC)
Center serves active duty military, their beneficiaries, and veterans with traumatic brain injuries through state-of-the-art clinical care, innovative clinical research initiatives and educational programs, and support for health protection services. Website includes educational materials, resources links, and the center’s locations.

MIRECC
Centers, which were established by Congress, research causes and treatments of mental disorders, and use education to put new knowledge into routine clinical practice at the Veterans Administration.

PDHealth.mil

Traumatic Brain Injury
Website provides information on TBI for patients, family members, and caregivers. Topics include types and symptoms of brain injury, TBI treatment and recovery, and insights on the potential long-term effects of brain injury. Animation is used to help patients understand the brain and the results of injuries to different parts of the brain. Includes personal stories of TBI victims and a resource center.

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