Bullying Prevention Awareness Month (October 2014)

10/2014

In support of Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) is providing resources for families, teens, educators, clinicians, mental health professionals, and law enforcement personnel on how to recognize, deal with, and prevent bullying.

Bullying can be verbal, physical, or via the Internet. It can severely affect the victim's self-image, social interactions, and school performance―often leading to insecurity, lack of self-esteem, and depression in adulthood. School dropout rates and absences among victims of bullying are much higher than among other students.

Studies have shown that children who have been identified as a bully by age eight are six times more likely to have a criminal conviction by age 24. Children who are bullies may continue to be bullies as adults, and are more prone to becoming child and spouse abusers.

The following resources provide information regarding bullying and bullying prevention for families and their communities.

Page Contents

Featured NCTSN Resources

NCTSN Schools and Trauma Speaker Series: Sticks and Stones Will Break My Bones, (and) Words CAN Hurt Me 
Offered through NCTSN’s Learning Center for Child and Adolescent Trauma. Uses the prevalence and impact of trauma as a lens through which to deepen participants' understanding of bullying. Applicable for school mental health professionals, school staff, and other interested individuals, the program considers the impact of bullying on the targeted child as well as on the bully, and addresses the response at the school site.

Staying Safe While Staying Connected: Facts and Tips for Teens (2010) (PDF)
Addresses risks that come with continually staying connected via cell phones and computers through texting, tweeting, IMing, e-mailing, blogging, and posting.

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For Families

Embrace Civility
A program of Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use, promotes approaches that will best ensure young people become 'cyber savvy' and addresses youth risk in a positive and restorative manner.

The Cyberbullying Research Center
A clearinghouse for “up-to-date information about the nature, extent, causes, and consequences of cyberbullying among adolescents . . . [and on] the ways adolescents use and misuse technology. Geared to parents, educators, law enforcement officers, counselors, and others who work with youth.  Includes facts, figures, and detailed stories from those who have been directly impacted by online aggression; and numerous resources for preventing and responding to cyberbullying incidents.

i-SAFE Inc.
Educates youth and others (e.g., educators, parents, law enforcement professionals) on how to safely and responsibly use the Internet (and other information-and-communication technologies). Includes a K–12 curriculum, and outreach programs for parents, law enforcement personnel, and community leaders.

Pacer Center

  • National Bullying Prevention Center
    A website that provides basic facts about bullying and treatments; videos, first-person stories, and information on how to talk to your kids about bullying. Includes products and links to other related resources and websites.

Safe in YourSpace
This website provides information on cyberspace safety and encourages children, parents and teachers to talk with one another about how to stay safe online. Includes information covering various areas including cyberbullying, financial scams, and sexual victimization.

U.S. Department of Education

  • Parent and Family Engagement
    This website provides a place where parents and families can access information from across ED.gov. Topics include Section 1118 of Title I, special education, fatherhood, military families, early learning, and bullying.

StopBullying.gov

A website for parents, children, and educators that offers strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

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For Teens and Tweens

GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network)
A national education organization whose mission is centered on creating safe spaces in schools for K–12 students. They seek to “develop school climates where difference is valued for the positive contribution it makes in creating a more vibrant and diverse community.” The website and resources are focused on the acceptance of all people regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, or occupation. Includes information on their research and policymaking, plus tools and tips.

Pacer Center

  • Teens Against Bullying
    An interactive site where teens can learn about preventing and responding to bullying—in cyberspace, via texting, and at school. Includes resources for kids and parents, and information on Facebook safety.

NetSmartz® Workshop
An interactive, educational program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline through education, engagement, and empowerment. Designed for children ages 5-17, parents and guardians, educators, and law enforcement. Includes videos, games, activity cards, and presentations.

STOP Cyberbulling
An interactive website offering resources to help prevent cyberbullying, encouraging everyone to “be part of the solution.” The materials are divided into   six sections: children (aged 7–10), preteens (aged 11–13), teens (aged 14–17), parents/caregivers, educators, and law enforcement personnel. Topics include 1) definition of cyberbullying, 2) how it works (types of cyberbullying), 3) why kids cyberbully, 4) preventing cyberbullying, 5) taking action, and 6) law enforcement. Users can download most of the materials by clicking on icons (Microsoft Word or PDF) on the top of the pages, especially helpful for easy creation of handouts and information packs for teaching and research.

The Trevor Project
A national organization that provides “crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth. . . . The Trevor Lifeline is the only nationwide, around-the-clock crisis and suicide prevention lifeline for LGBTQ youth . . . a free and confidential service that offers hope and someone to talk to, 24/7. Each year, tens of thousands of calls are fielded from young people across the country.” The website includes a directory of local services, tips for helping LGBTQ youth, workshops, resources for educators and parents, a live chatline with trained volunteers, and much more.

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For Educators

Committee for Children
Works globally to prevent bullying, violence, and child abuse. The website offers programs, training (including free webinars), classroom activities, videos, resources for funding, an online store, and more.

GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network)
A national education organization whose mission is centered on creating safe spaces in schools for K–12 students. They seek to “develop school climates where difference is valued for the positive contribution it makes in creating a more vibrant and diverse community.” The website and resources are focused on the acceptance of all people regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, or occupation. Includes information on their research and policymaking, plus tools and tips.

  • Anti-Bullying Resources
    "Through research-based interventions, GLSEN provides resources and support for schools to implement effective and age-appropriate anti-bullying programs to improve school climate for all students. While many schools show a willingness to address bullying generally, effective efforts must address the pervasive issue of anti-LGBT bullying as a crucial element of the problem. These programs and resources aim to help all members of the school community address bullying in inclusive and effective ways."

Institute on Family & Neighborhood Life [Clemson University]

  • Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
    A schoolwide program (for elementary, middle, and junior high schools) designed to reduce and prevent bullying problems, and to improve peer relations among schoolchildren. Offers training for school staff and for National Olweus trainers.

i-SAFE
A nonprofit foundation whose online safety education programs are available throughout the U.S. and in Department of Defense schools around the world.

  • Educators
    Online, classroom, and community interactive curriculums on Internet safety; includes certification program.

National Center for School Engagement

  • Bully Proof Your School (2008) (PDF)
    A program “for handling bully/victim problems through the creation of a ‘caring majority’ of students who take the lead in establishing and maintaining a safe and caring school community.” Improves school climate, addresses bystander and bullying behavior, teaches protective skills, and much more. Workshops are targeted to early childhood, elementary, middle, and high school personnel.
  • Bullying and Teasing of Youth with Disabilities: Creating Positive School Environments for Effective Inclusion (PDF)
    Information for educators about bullying and teasing within schools, especially harassment targeted toward children with disabilities.

Safe in YourSpace
This website provides information on cyberspace safety and encourages children, parents and teachers to talk with one another about how to stay safe online. Includes information covering various areas including cyberbullying, financial scams, and sexual victimization.

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators providing strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

U.S Department of Justice

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For Clinicians and Mental Health Professionals

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators providing strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

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For Law Enforcement Personnel

Fight Crime: Invest in Kids

  • Bullying Prevention Is Crime Prevention (2003) (PDF)
    A report focusing on how bullying is related to depression, suicide, crime, and violence; and the prevalence of bullying and the effects it has on children. Includes a call for action addressed to “local, state and national policy makers to invest in proven anti-bullying measures for every school in America.”

The International Association of Chiefs of Police

  • Developing an Anti-Bullying Program: Increasing Safety, Reducing Violence (2006) (PDF)
    Part of a series of briefs in Juvenile Justice: Law Enforcement Training and Technical Assistance designed to help law enforcement leaders develop a proactive youth bullying–prevention program. Includes examples of programs that have significantly reduced bullying in schools, effective roles law enforcement personnel can play in bullying prevention, and links to many other related resources.

StopBullying.gov
A website for parents, children, and educators providing strategies to reduce bullying in schools. Includes information about why children bully, what to do if you are being bullied, and what parents can do if their child is being bullied. Features "Cool Stuff," targeted toward children including webisodes, character profiles, and games. Also offers Spanish content materials for parents, survey and training opportunities, links to training videos and workshops, consultation (via phone and e-mail), and many other resources.

U.S. Department of Justice―Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)

  • Bullying in Schools (2002) (PDF)
    Part of the Problem-Oriented Guides for Police Series. Describes bullying and its effects; outlines effective prevention and intervention strategies; offers techniques for speaking about bullying with school officials, victims, and offenders; includes resources.

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