The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART) Assessment Survey

Submitted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/15/2014 - 14:47

Overview

Acronym: 
CART Survey
Author(s): 
Pfefferbaum, R. L., Ph.D., M.P.H., Pfefferbaum, B., M.D., J.D., & Van Horn, R. L., Ph.D.
Citation: 

Pfefferbaum, R. L., Pfefferbaum, B., & Van Horn, R. L. (2011, 2013 May). Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART) Survey. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: Terrorism and Disaster Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

Obtain(Email/Website): 

Request information by email at: tdc@ouhsc.edu. Versions of the survey instrument are available in the online CART manual at the Terrorism and Disaster Center website at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: http://www.oumedicine.com/psychiatry/research/terrorism-and-disaster-center (see Interventions: Community Resilience)

Cost: 
Free
Copyrighted: 
Yes
Measure Description: 

This theory-based, field-tested survey instrument assesses a community's resilience across multiple domains (Connection and Caring, Resources, Transformative Potential, Disaster Management, and Information and Communication), explores participants' personal relationship to their community, and queries standard demographics. The CART survey design encourages the addition of items to address specific concerns for a sponsoring organization and/or the community of being assessed. Survey results provide a snapshot of strengths and challenges that are meaningful for the particular community and for organizations participating in the process.

Language(s) : 
English
Spanish
Age Range: 
not applicable
Measure Type: 
Other
Other Measure Type: 
community assessment
# of Items: 
varies by application
Measure Format: 
Questionnaire
Average Time to Complete (min): 
15-20
Reporter Type: 
Other
Other Reporter Type: 
community member report of perceptions
Response Format: 

Varies by question. Core community resilience items use a 5 point scale:

1=Strongly Disagree

2=Disagree

3=Neither Disagree Nor Agree

4=Agree

5=Strongly Agree

Materials Needed: 
Paper/Pencil
Computer
Sample Item(s): 
DomainsScalesSample Items
Connection and Caring 

People in this community feel like they belong to the community.

People in this community are committed to the well-being of the community.

Resources 

This community has the resources it needs to take care of community problems (resources include money, information, technology, tools, raw materials, and services).

People in this community are able to get the services they need.

Transformative Potential 

People in this community work together to improve the community.

This community develops skills and finds resources to solve its problems and reach its goals.

Disaster Management 

This community actively prepares for future disasters.

This community can provide emergency services during a disaster.

Information and Communication 

This community has mechanisms for routinely providing accurate information to residents about local issues.

This community has a person(s) who is trusted to deliver accurate information to its residents in time of need or crisis.

Information Provided: 
Areas of Concern/Risks
Strengths

Training

Administration Training: 
Other
Other Administration Training: 
survey interviewing if administered by interview
Training to Interpret: 
Other
Other Training to Interpret: 
basic statistical calculations

Parallel/Alternate Forms

Parallel Form: 
No
Alternate Form: 
Yes
Different Age Forms: 
No
Altered Version Forms: 
Yes
Describe Alternative Forms: 

Optional questions are available to address a variety of issues. Sponsoring organizations and communities can add questions in accordance with their specific interests.

Psychometrics

Clinical Cutoffs: 
No
If Yes, Specify Cutoffs: 
Not applicable
Reliability: 
Internal Consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the CART Survey instrument dimensions
ConstructsCRI sample (Fall 2008) CCC sample (Spring 2009)
Connection and Caring0.810.85
Transformative Potential0.800.69
Resources0.920.87
Disaster Management0.850.84
References for Reliability: 

Pfefferbaum, R.L., Neas, B. R., Pfefferbaum, B., Norris, F.H., & Van Horn RL (2013). The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): Development of a survey instrument to assess community resilience. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience, 15(1), 15-30.

Content Validity Evaluated: 
Yes
References for Content Validity: 

Pfefferbaum, R.L., Neas, B. R., Pfefferbaum, B., Norris, F.H., & Van Horn RL (2013). The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): Development of a survey instrument to assess community resilience. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience, 15(1), 15-30.

Construct Validity Evaluated: 
Yes
Construct Validity: 
Validity TypeNot knownNot foundNonclincal SamplesClinical SamplesDiverse Samples
Convergent/Concurrentx
Discriminantx
Sensitive to Changex
Intervention Effectsx
Longitudinal/Maturation Effects
Sensitive to Theoretically Distinct Groupsx
Factorial Validityx
References for Construct Validity: 

Pfefferbaum, R.L., Neas, B. R., Pfefferbaum, B., Norris, F.H., & Van Horn RL (2013). The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): Development of a survey instrument to assess community resilience. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience, 15(1), 15-30.

Criterion Validity: 
Not KnownNot FoundNonclinical SamplesClinical SamplesDiverse Samples
Predictive Validity:x
Postdictive Validity: x
Overall Psychometric Limitations: 

Difficult to assess criterion validity given the absence of other validated instruments measuring the resilience of a community to disasters. Further studies are needed to determine the range of scores needed for a community to be deemed resilient.

Translation Quality

Language(s) Other Than English: 
Language:TranslatedBack TranslatedReliableGood PsychometricsSimilar Factor StructureNorms AvailableMeasure Developed for This Group
1. Spanishxx

Population Information

Population Used For Measure Development: 

Data from four field test samples were used to refine the survey instrument: (1) an initial mixed sample involving faith-based groups in two rural communities (n = 81), representatives of multiple community agencies (e.g., fire, hospitals, mental health, police, public health, schools) in a city of approximately 25,000 residents (n = 48), and community college social work students in a city of 1.5 million people (n = 44) which together created the total sample (N = 173); (2) a sample of affiliated volunteer responders from the Phoenix, Arizona, Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program (N=225); (3) a sample consisting of residents in five poverty neighborhoods in Shreveport-Bossier, Louisiana (N=352); and (4) a community sample (drawn to be random, with oversampling in neighborhoods identified as particularly vulnerable) from Abilene, Texas (N=453).

Measure has demonstrated evidence of reliability and validity in which populations?: 
Natural Disaster
Community Violence
Terrorism
Other
Other populations: 
Not necessarily used with trauma populations but the instrument could ber used for assessment of communities affected by various types of adversity.

Pros & Cons/References

Pros: 

1. Instrument is theory-based, field-tested, and evidence-informed.

2. It is one of a limited number of available measures of community resilience.

3. The instrument permits the identification of community strengths and challenges based on perceptions of community members.

 

Cons: 

1. In that the instrument measures the perceptions of community members, it does not provide an externally-based, objective measure of a community’s resilience.

Author Comments : 

References: 

Pfefferbaum, R.L., Neas, B.R., Pfefferbaum, B., Norris, F.H., & Van Horn RL (2013). The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): Development of a survey instrument to assess community resilience. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience, 15(1), 15-30.


Pfefferbaum, R.L., Pfefferbaum, B., & Van Horn, R.L. (2011, 2013 May). Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): The CART Integrated System. Oklahoma City, OK: Terrorism and Disaster Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.


Pfefferbaum, R.L., Pfefferbaum, B., Van Horn, R.L., Klomp, R.W., Norris, F.H., & Reissman, D.B. (2013). The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): An intervention to build community resilience to disasters. J Public Health Management Practice, 19(3), 250–258.


Pfefferbaum, R.L., Pfefferbaum, B., Van Horn, R.L., Neas, B.R., & Houston, J.B. (2013). Building community resilience to disasters through a community-based intervention: CART© applications. Journal of Emergency Management, 11(2), 151-159.
 

Developer of Review: 
Betty Pfefferbaum, M.D., J.D.
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