Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II

Treatment and Services Adaptation Centers - Category II

Fordham University & Hunter College Schools of Social Work, Creating and Sustaining the Next Generation of Trauma-Informed Practitioners

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2009-2012]
Description: 
The Creating & Sustaining the Next Generation of Trauma-Informed Practitioners project will implement “Core Concepts First"—a model that combines foundational developmentally informed trauma knowledge with five treatments designed to treat the pervasive developmental effects of trauma. The center's model will transform NCTSN trauma training; and will increase the capacity of practitioners, schools of social work (SSWs), and community agencies to provide children, adolescents, and their families with the most effective trauma-informed treatment. Working with practitioners, community-based agencies, NCSTN Category II sites, and SSWs, the center will implement its Core Concepts First model, which combines NCTSN’s Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma (CCCT) with trauma treatment trainings. The goals of the project are to strengthen trauma training by: 1) increasing practitioners’ knowledge of developmental trauma; 2) transforming the ways in which the NCTSN offers trauma treatment training; 3) creating the infrastructure to assist community agencies to become organizationally ready to introduce and sustain trauma treatment; 4) developing the capacity of practitioners and community agencies to provide developmentally informed trauma care for military families and children, and Native American children; and 5) extending the center's local, regional, and national reach. The populations to be served are community agencies, SSWs, current practitioners and future (now student) practitioners who work with children and youth whose early exposure to multiple episodes of interpersonal violence in the context of deprivation and neglect puts them at increased risk for negative developmental consequences across their lifespan. During the four years of the grant, the project will reach more than 1,500 agency practitioners, 30–40 new SSWs, and more than 2,000 students.
Contact: 
Virginia Strand
Phone: 
(914) 367-3435

University of Montana, National Native Children's Trauma Center

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The National Native Children's Trauma Center (NNCTC) will work in collaboration with Indian Health Service (IHS) and other providers in tribal communities across the country to utilize evidence-based, culturally appropriate, trauma-informed interventions for American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) children, youth, and military families who experience disproportionate violence, grief, and/or poverty; and childhood, historical, and/or intergenerational trauma. The center will serve as a national leader in trauma intervention training and workforce development. The four goals are to: 1) train IHS clinicians in two evidence-based trauma treatments: Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI) and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT); 2) equip schools to provide trauma-focused interventions and services; 3) enhance trauma-informed child welfare practices and replicate them in four IHS service areas; 4) engage members of the center's National Expert Advisory Council (NEAC) as well as traditional healers, council leaders, and community members to ensure high fidelity replication of evidence-based practices; 5) use the Warrior Society Model to improve natural supports for Native children whose parents are or were deployed; and 6) increase the number of tribal partnerships with the center. The primary focus will be on infrastructure development through training and technical assistance of behavioral health. Over the four years of this grant, training will be delivered to 360 adult providers serving a total of 34,800 children and youth with trauma.

Contact: 
Rick Van Den Pol
Phone: 
(406) 243-6756

Justice Resource Institute, Complex Trauma Treatment Network

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2009 - 2012, 2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 
The Complex Trauma Treatment Network (CTTN) will develop, adapt, and disseminate evidence-based practices (EBPs) for children and adolescents impacted by complex trauma. The project’s goals are to: 1) transform multicounty and state systems of care serving children and families impacted by complex trauma; 2) address gaps in complex trauma services to youth of color living in poverty and/or with urban violence; and in residential treatment centers, juvenile justice detention centers, shelters, and foster care; 3) enhance graduate-level social work education to cultivate a sustainable provider workforce across the child services continuum trained in complex trauma; 4) increase national access to EBPs for complex trauma including: Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competence (ARC), Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS), and Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET); and 5) expand regional, national, virtual, and Web-based dissemination of products and resources from CTTN and NCTSN. The CTTN will also provide intensive training and technical assistance to transform systems of care in more than 200 community and state agencies participating in one of 18 Learning Communities; and will train more than 20,000 multidisciplinary child service providers on the impact, assessment diagnosis, and treatment of complex trauma in at least twenty states. This initiative will directly impact 100,000+ children and families nationwide.
Contact: 
Joseph Spinazzola
Phone: 
(617) 232-1303

New York University School of Medicine, NYU CCTS in Child Welfare & Mental Health

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The NYU Center on Coordinated Trauma Services (NYU CCTS) in Child Welfare and Mental Health will be developed by the New York University Child Study Center, in collaboration with the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the New York City Administration on Children's Services (ACS).The NYC CCTS will be an NCTSN Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center focusing on child abuse services, Child Protective Services, and child welfare. The overarching aims are to provide national expertise, and to support the specialized adaptation of effective treatment and service approaches for children and families with trauma-related mental health needs in the child welfare system across the United States. The four main goals are to: 1) raise public awareness of the scope and serious impact of child traumatic stress on children and families in the child welfare system; 2) disseminate effective services and interventions that improve the standard of care for children and families in the child welfare system; 3) advance the capacity of and improve processes in the child welfare system so that the needs of children and families can be better served; and 4) foster a community dedicated to collaboration within and beyond the NCTSN so that knowledge of the needs of children and families in the child welfare system can be improved over time, and so that interventions and services designed to meet these needs can have the greatest possible impact.

Contact: 
Glenn Saxe
Phone: 
(646) 754-5050

Uniformed Services University, School of Medicine, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The challenges of military children and families are substantial and require greater understanding, education, and services than they are currently receiving. Some of the most severe experiences that military children face are related to wartime stress: specifically, deployment of military parents to combat, parental injury or illness, or parental death. Little if any data exist in many of these areas. The Uniformed Services University Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress (USU CSTS) Child and Family Program is responsible for developing knowledge related to military childhood experiences, developing effective public education materials, and expanding and studying effective intervention strategies, all using a strength-based approach.

Though USU CSTS does not receive funding from SAMHSA, it functions as a Treatment and Services Adaptation Center within the NCTSN. The center serves as a consultant to the Network, acts as a knowledge development and dissemination center, and creates trauma-focused products specific to military families.

Contact: 
Stephen Cozza
Phone: 
(301) 295-2470
Email: 

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Family Informed Trauma Treatment (FITT) Center

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2007 - 2011]
Description: 

The Family-Informed Trauma Treatment (FITT) Center will lead local and national efforts to understand the impact of how trauma—especially complex trauma—impacts families, that families are the foundation through which children comprehend and cope with their traumatic experiences, and that family trauma interventions optimize healing. The FITT Center will enhance system capacity to address the needs of children and their families using a two-pronged approach of increasing provider capacity and the effectiveness of consumer advocacy. Objectives include providing new training and tools for child service systems’ workforces engaged with family systems exposed to chronic trauma related to poverty by: 1) widely disseminating via the FITT Toolkit; and 2) developing innovative training curricula, focusing on family-informed, evidence-based trauma interventions for mental health professionals and for master’s-level and doctoral students.  Collaborating with 19 Children’s Trauma Centers (CTCs) and other provider organizations that support large numbers of families living in poverty, the center will improve access to three effective family trauma treatments: Strengthening Families Coping Resources (SFCR), Trauma-Adapted Family Connections (TA-FC), and FamilyLive (FL); and to a family-based assessment and treatment planning tool: Family Assessment of Needs and Strengths-Trauma (FANS-Trauma).. Additionally, the FITT Center will develop messages and tools designed to help families learn how to be heard as they advocate in the public arena and within child service systems.

Contact: 
Laurel Kiser
Phone: 
(410) 706-2490
Email: 

University of Illinois at Chicago, Urban Youth Trauma Center, Institute for Juvenile Research

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The Urban Youth Trauma Center (UYTC): Treatment Collaborative for Trauma and Violence (TCTV) will promote and disseminate comprehensive, integrated, and coordinated care for multiproblem, at-risk youth affected by trauma and violence involved with delinquency or the justice system. The program will strengthen both service system connectivity and community-based best practices for trauma-informed intervention and prevention, particularly among court judges, juvenile justice probation officers, and law enforcement staff. TCTV goals are to: 1) increase awareness about the needs of traumatized youth who are affected by community and domestic violence—and who are involved with court, juvenile justice, and law enforcement systems—while emphasizing the enhancement of community resources and service system collaboration; 2) disseminate trauma-informed treatment approaches designed for multiproblem youth experiencing traumatic stress, violence exposure, and co-occurring substance abuse—using Trauma Systems Therapy for Adolescent Substance Abuse (TST-SA)—and disruptive behavior problems, using STRONG Families; and 3) provide training and consultation to facilitate service system and community resource collaboration, using a socioecologically based and trauma-informed model of collaboration developed by UYTC, called YOUTH-CAN (Youth Overcoming Urban Trauma and Healing through Community Action Network), which promotes the use of best practices for trauma intervention and violence prevention among youth service providers within targeted communities.
Contact: 
Jaleel Abdul-Adil
Phone: 
(312) 413-1371

Northwestern University Medical School, Center for Child Trauma Assessment and Planning

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2010 - 2013]
Description: 
The Center for Child Trauma Assessment and Service Planning (CCTASP) at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine will specialize in comprehensive, trauma-focused assessment; training and consultation; and development, implementation, and evaluation of interventions focused on the developmental effects of trauma. The CCTASP will build an infrastructure to more effectively assess the developmental effects of trauma across child-serving systems, develop intervention resources to address identified needs in practice, and enhance widespread dissemination and application of effective interventions. Interventions will be geared toward children, adolescents, caregivers, and providers across a range of child-serving settings with a particular focus on child welfare, residential treatment centers, and juvenile justice. The center will emphasize the dissemination and application of the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths-Trauma (CANS-Trauma) as a trauma-focused and strengths-based comprehensive assessment, treatment, and systems planning tool. Additionally, the CCTASP will translate and apply assessment information in a meaningful way for providers and consumers. The goals of CCTASP are to: 1) enhance education in and skill-building on a range of developmental effects of trauma across child-serving settings; 2) expand dissemination of and increase accessibility to comprehensive trauma-focused assessments on the developmental effects of trauma across child-serving settings; 3) enhance translation of trauma-focused assessments in practice; and 4) integrate and disseminate trauma-focused assessments and service/treatment interventions on the developmental effects of trauma.
Contact: 
Cassandra Kisiel
Phone: 
(312) 503-0459

Yale Child Study Center, Childhood Violent Trauma Center

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016, 2010 - 2013, 2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 

The Childhood Violent Trauma Center (CVTC) of the Child Study Center at the Yale School of Medicine will serve as the lead Treatment and Services Adaption (TSA) Center in the areas of acute, early, and brief intervention. Efforts will focus on the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI), designed to help children and adolescents aged 7–18 who have experienced potentially traumatic events (PTE)—including sexual and physical abuse, domestic violence (DV), community violence (CV), and injuries and accidents—and who have exhibited symptoms of acute stress. The project will broaden the application, adoption, and dissemination of CFTSI with a variety of populations and service systems through: 1) continued adaptation and implementation of CFTSI in Child Advocacy Centers (CACs); 2) continued adaption of CFTSI for children in foster care; and 3) development of adaptations of CFTSI for implementation in DV shelters and emergency departments, and with military families. CFTSI dissemination will be broadened by conducting a national Learning Collaborative and by building training capacity via a Train-the-Trainer program. Additionally, a Web-based CFTSI Site Sustainability System (CS3) will be developed to collect, analyze, and report clinical outcomes and implementation process data, which will support continuous quality improvement and sustainability.

Contact: 
Steven Marans
Phone: 
(203) 785-3377

University of Southern California, Trauma Services Adaptation (TSA) Center for Resiliency, Hope, and Wellness in Schools

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2009 - 2012]
Description: 

The Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center for Resiliency, Hope, and Wellness in Schools will: 1) serve as the primary resource site for schools to access trauma-related products and training through the NCTSN; 2) develop and disseminate school-based, trauma-informed interventions to improve schools’ understanding of and responses to trauma; and 3) create technology-enhanced tools and materials for broader dissemination in schools. Given the broad array of traumas experienced by students, and in an effort to help meet the training and service needs of each school, the center will address all types of trauma. The center will also partner with the NCCTS and its member and alumni sites to build resilience in schools by preparing and educating school personnel to be responsive to the needs of children and families with seamless, accessible, and effective services that involve all members of the school community. Additionally, the center will fill critical gaps by providing widespread access to, training in, and implementation support for materials and resources including: 1) enhancing the expertise of school personnel in the prevention-recovery continuum (including violence and bullying prevention) and in using the methodology in the Listen, Protect, and Connect — Model & Teach Psychological First Aid for Children (endorsed by the U.S. Department of Education) for school crisis intervention; 2) addressing the lack of evidence-based programs in schools with minimal mental health resources by disseminating the teacher-led Support for Students Exposed to Trauma (SSET) program, and by developing a self-guided Web-based Student Trauma Resiliency Curriculum (STRC) program for older middle and high school students; 3) extending the reach of school-based trauma interventions to address the needs of elementary-age students by incorporating the Bounce Back program; and 4) identifying and addressing the needs of particularly vulnerable students such as LGBT youth.
 

Contact: 
Marleen Wong
Phone: 
(213) 740-0840
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