Affiliate Member Organizations and Individuals

Affiliate Member Organizations and Individuals

Bethany Christian Services, Project Return Home

Funding Period: 
[2008 - 2012]
Description: 

Project Return Home will expand the reach and impact of Bethany Christian Services' existing child trauma center to serve urban Grand Rapids and the metropolitan Kent County area of West Central Michigan. The target population is traumatized children aged 3-18 who have been removed from their homes due to child abuse, neglect, or maltreatment, and who live in foster care or other out-of-home placement. Trauma treatment will also be delivered to their parents, most of whom struggle with their own unresolved sources of childhood trauma. The project will adapt/replicate an empirically based trauma-informed treatment model to help foster children achieve four measurable outcomes: 1) reduce behavioral problems extending from childhood trauma; 2) increase the rate and timeliness of child-family reunification; 3) reduce the number of disrupted foster placements; and 4) reduce the rates of recidivism for repeat out-of-home placement of children.

Bethany will partner with the Child and Adolescent Traumatic Stress Center of Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA, to replicate the Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) model for foster children, and will draw on the resources of its own Child and Family Traumatic Stress Center that has successfully implemented two other U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-funded clinical models for treating traumatized adopted youth and youth aging out of the foster care system.

Contact: 
Mark Peterson
Phone: 
(616) 224-7617

National Collaborative for Homeless Children and Trauma

Funding Period: 
[2003-2007]
Description: 
The National Collaborative for Homeless Children and Trauma was formed by the National Center on Family Homelessness in partnership with the Trauma Center and the Vanderbilt Institute for Public Policy Studies. In conjunction with three community-based domestic violence and homeless agencies, the collaborative provides trauma-related services to homeless children and their families, and builds on local work to increase knowledge within NCTSN and beyond about the range of trauma experienced by homeless children and their parents (e.g., physical and sexual assault, witnessing violence, abrupt separation). The collaborative also helps develop effective cross-system partnerships that meet survivors' needs; creates effective services in Boston area shelters; and advocates locally and nationally to improve society's response to homeless families.
Contact: 
Kathleen Guarino
Phone: 
(617) 964-3834

Adolescent Traumatic Stress and Substance Abuse Treatment Center

Funding Period: 
[2003 - 2007]
Description: 

The Adolescent Traumatic Stress and Substance Abuse (ATSSA) program is housed within the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CARD) at Boston University. ATSSA's mission has been to improve the standard of care for adolescents with co-occurring traumatic stress and substance use through the identification and development of treatment and service approaches for this underserved population. An integrated intervention for traumatic stress and substance abuse was developed, piloted, and implemented among several Network sites. The resulting intervention—Trauma Systems Therapy for Adolescent Substance Abuse (TST-SA)—employs a socioecological approach to address emotional regulation and environmental stability needs of youth and families.

In collaboration with NCTSN centers, the ATSSA program has led the development of Understanding the Links between Adolescent Trauma and Substance Abuse: A Toolkit for Providers. The Adolescent Traumatic Stress and Substance Abuse Treatment Center at CARD continues to provide evidence-based treatments for youth and families with a wide range of anxiety disorders. In addition, CARD continues to make significant contributions to the understanding of anxiety disorders, as well as the development, evaluation, and dissemination of effective treatment programs.

Contact: 
David H. Barlow
Phone: 
(617) 353-9610

Kennedy Krieger Family Center - Integrated Trauma Approaches

Funding Period: 
[2007 - 2011 and 2003 - 2007]
Description: 
The Kennedy Krieger Family Center (KKFC) is a program of Kennedy Krieger Institute, a Johns Hopkins University-affiliated specialty hospital internationally recognized for improving the lives of children and adolescents with developmental disabilities through patient care, training, research, and special education. Located in an urban community in Baltimore, KKFC has three programs: outpatient mental health, therapeutic foster care, and early Head Start. The KKFC Integrated Trauma Approaches program is being implemented in the outpatient program, a high-volume clinic that provides comprehensive, trauma informed, culturally sensitive mental health evaluation and treatment to children and families who are survivors of simple or complex trauma.
Contact: 
Elizabeth Thompson
Phone: 
(443) 923-5918

The Edmund Ervin Pediatric Center, Mid-Maine Child Trauma Network

Funding Period: 
[2002 - 2005]
Description: 
Mid-Maine Child Trauma Network has worked closely with the Maine Department of Health and Human Services and private mental health service providers/agencies to strengthen the infrastructure of rural community services to children who have experienced traumatic stress and their families. Network membership is open to organizations that serve traumatized children and their families. Network activities include: 1) identifying community resources, needs, and coordination opportunities among foster care, domestic violence, emergency health care, mental health, and terrorism/disaster response services; 2) piloting triage assessment and outcome evaluation protocols in the above areas; 3) providing training and consultation to increase trauma assessment and intervention resources; and 4) facilitating interagency development and coordination of child trauma services.
Contact: 
Stephen Meister
Phone: 
(207) 872-4163

LSU Health Sciences Center, Louisiana Rural Trauma Services Center

Funding Period: 
[2008 - 2012 and 2003 - 2007]
Description: 
The Louisiana Rural Trauma Services Center (LRTSC) provides and enhances urgently needed crisis and mental health services for underserved children, adolescents, and families in rural Louisiana who have experienced traumatic stress as a result of disasters, community and family violence, accidents, loss of family members, and medical conditions. LRTSC works directly with rural hospitals and with school districts to conduct professional trainings that are developmentally sensitive and specific to aspects of crisis response. In schools, LRTSC professionals train staff to recognize the signs of trauma exposure, to differentiate children's responses to crisis situations, and to mitigate the impact of trauma. In 2004, at the request of the Louisiana 24th Judicial District, LRTSC expanded its mission to include work with trauma-exposed children and families who present in court. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, LRTSC has been providing services to children and families evacuated from New Orleans and now residing in rural parishes. Community advisory boards comprising community stakeholders provide input to LRTSC and collaborative partners for the LRTSC including the Louisiana State Department of Education, the Office of Mental Health, and public and community hospitals. Refunded in 2008, LRTSC will provide and evaluate a continuum of care of trauma-focused trainings, interventions, and services for children and adolescents aged 3?{18, including children of military families, in schools in Orleans, St. Bernard, and Plaquemines parishes that were heavily impacted by Hurricane Katrina. Due to the extent of the devastation and the complexity of recovery, training and service models will be adapted, modified for cultural sensitivity, and implemented to meet needs at this time. LRTSC has a strong commitment to providing culturally competent, evidence-based services, collaborating with Network members in meeting the goals of the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative. Services are offered within school and preschool settings with parent, student, and school support. LRTSC will work at consensus building with input from families, school and military personnel, community, service providers, and other stakeholders in modifying trauma-focused practices and services with sensitivity to cultural competence.
Contact: 
Joy Osofsky
Phone: 
(504) 296-9011

La Rabida Children's Hospital, Chicago Child Trauma Center

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2005 - 2009]
Description: 
La Rabida Children's Hospital's Chicago Child Trauma Center (CCTC) serves inner-city African Americans and other Chicago-area children exposed to the full range of traumatic events including medical trauma and complex trauma. Refunded, the CCTC now expects serve a total of 1,350 children, and will evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for urban African American children. Effective practices will then be disseminated to major child service system stakeholders. Given the CCTC's emphasis on resiliency and consumer involvement, expertise in child trauma, experience in the NCTSN, regional and national reputations, and existing collaborative relationships, the center expects to increase and enhance services to traumatized children in the Chicago area. As the only Community Treatment and Services Center in the NCTSN whose primary mission is serving urban African American children living in poverty, the CCTC brings to the Network a sophisticated understanding of societal, cultural, and multigenerational factors that shape children's responses to and recovery from exposure to trauma. Among the ten goals are: increasing capacity to provide Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), disseminating complex trauma interventions, and working with the Illinois Childhood Trauma Coalition to build trauma-informed service systems across the state.
Contact: 
Brad Stolbach
Phone: 
(773) 374-3748

Heartland Health Outreach, International Family, Adolescent and Child Enhancement Services (IFACES)

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 
Community-Based Refugee Trauma Treatment (Community-Based RTT) is a program of International FACES (Family, Adolescent and Child Enhancement Services) at Heartland Health Outreach, which provides services to refugee children, adolescents, and families in Chicago suffering from trauma-related distress or emotional stress resulting from and exacerbated by the refugee experience. More than half of the refugee children seen at International FACES are diagnosed with anxiety disorders, including PTSD, and experience a variety of other trauma-related problems including persistent fears of death, violent memories and nightmares, insomnia, depression, behavior disorders, developmental delays, or poor performance in school. International FACES will expand its culturally and linguistically appropriate, trauma-informed service model to include adaptation and application of the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS). IFACES, in collaboration with World Relief-Chicago's (WRC) Horizons Clinic, will provide in-school CBITS programming to help refugee students and their families manage the symptoms of trauma, develop their capacity to self-soothe, and improve their social and school functioning. Community-Based RTT services will be delivered to 200 children in four public schools located in multicultural neighborhoods on the north side of Chicago; in participants' homes; and on-site at International FACES and WRC's Horizons clinic.
Contact: 
Thad Rydberg
Phone: 
(773) 751-4188

Chaddock, Trauma Initiative of West Central Illinois

Funding Period: 
[2008 - 2012]
Description: 
The Chaddock Trauma Initiative of West Central Illinois (CTIWCI) will provide trauma-informed services to under-served children and adolescents who live in the rural community of Quincy, Illinois, and the surrounding tri-state area (Illinois, Iowa, Missouri). Using school and community settings, the project will focus on treating traumatic stress, and will also provide training for parents, foster parents, educators, and other professionals. The project will serve more than 1,780 clients, aged 0-19, and their families who have experienced trauma due to child abuse and neglect, violence, poverty, catastrophic events, and/or separation and loss, particularly among families of military personnel who have been deployed to the Middle East. The project's training component will serve approximately 1,500 adults each year. The goals are to: 1) infuse the tri-state area with specialized evidence-based practices including Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS), and Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS); 2) train parents and child-serving professionals to implement specialized trauma services; and 3) further develop best practice models of trauma-related services through collaboration and coordination with local, state, and national organizations.
Contact: 
Angel Knoverek
Phone: 
(217) 222-0034 x323

Catholic Charities Hawaii, HI-IMPACT

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012]
Description: 

The Catholic Charities Hawaii program Hawaii - Interventions, Mentoring, and Partnerships Aimed at Child Trauma (HI-IMPACT) on Oahu will provide clinical treatment for children and adolescents who have experienced traumatic events as victims and/or witnesses of domestic violence.

HI-IMPACT will utilize Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) in the treatment of children, adolescents, and their families. In addition, the HI-IMPACT program will provide community based trainings to educate state agencies, the military, schools, clinicians, and service providers on TF-CBT and working with traumatized children.

Contact: 
David Drews
Phone: 
(808) 527-4905
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