New York

University of Rochester, Mt. Hope Family Center, The Promoting Emotional Adjustment in Children Exposed to Violence (PEACE)

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2009 - 2012]
Description: 
The Promoting Emotional Adjustment in Children Exposed to Violence (PEACE) project at the Mount Hope Family Center will enhance the availability of evidence-based, trauma-treatment services to children and families exposed to violence—especially to intimate partner violence (IPV). Populations served will include children in the child welfare system, and children in military families who have high rates of IPV and child maltreatment. Approximately 720 children and parents will receive evidence-based trauma treatment during the course of the project. Three interventions will be used: Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Alternatives for Families-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT), and Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP). The program will also provide training on the effects of trauma on children and families, and will disseminate best practices in implementation of evidence-based interventions locally and nationally.
Contact: 
Sheree Toth
Phone: 
(585) 275-2991

Parsons Child and Family Center, Heroes Project

Funding Period: 
[2009 - 2012 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 
Parsons Child and Family Center’s Sidney Albert Training and Research Institute (SATRI) has provided training, consultation, and research as a NCTSN Community Practice sSite since 2002, including national and regional leadership in developing and disseminating evidence-supported trauma and resiliency-focused services for children and families with traumatic stress. The HEROES Project, a SAMHSA-funded NCTSN grant, provided integrated trauma-informed training for six programs at Parsons, the Albany County Children’s Mental Health Clinic, and the Albany County Department of Children, Youth and Families from 2009-2012. The Project trained therapists, foster parents, residential counselors, child protective services workers, and educators, and evaluated of the efficacy of Real Life Heroes (RLH), a trauma and resiliency-focused treatment, to help children and families who had experienced multiple and interpersonal traumas such as emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, domestic violence, losses, or community violence. Results of HEROES Project research are being published in a journal of the American Psychological Association and include statistically significant decreases in child behavior problems and trauma symptoms. The study supported the efficacy of implementing trauma and resiliency-focused treatment in a wide range of child welfare and children’s mental health programs. Following Parsons’ affiliation with the Northeast Parent and Child Society in 2012, the scope of SATRI training and consultation has more than doubled. The combined agencies currently serve more than 12,000 children and family members each year in 46 counties of New York State with 60 programs and over 1,200 staff. Primary service areas include: eEarly cChildhood, eEducation, tTraining and& rResearch, bBehavioral hHealth, fFamily fFoster cCare, rResidential cCare, cCase mManagement, pPrevention and& fFamily pPreservation, and cCareer dDevelopment. As a NCTSN affiliate organizations, the two agencies have continued Parsons’ commitment to “‘learning, adapting, creating, and delivering the most effective services for children and families.”’ In the last two years (2012-2014), Parsons’ sStaff have led, or co-led 13 workshops or presentations at national and regional conferences, and co-authored two articles in peer-reviewed journals and one chapter in a highly regarded book on the treatment of complex trauma in children and adolescents. Training programs, research, and publications continue Parsons’ commitment over the last 12 years to collaborative work with other NCTSN colleagues on disseminating evidence-supported trauma treatment. This has included participation in the NCTSN Affiliate Advisory Group, the Complex Trauma and Integrated Health Care committees, and co-leadership of the NCTSN Resource Parent Workgroup, which developed a highly regarded trauma-informed training used by foster, kinship, and adoptive parents across the United States. Training in Real Life Heroes, the Resource Parent Curriculum, and consultation on implementation of trauma-informed treatment in child welfare and children’s behavioral health programs are available through the Parsons SATRI.
Contact: 
Richard Kagan
Phone: 
(518) 426-2600

Fordham University & Hunter College Schools of Social Work, Creating and Sustaining the Next Generation of Trauma-Informed Practitioners

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2009-2012]
Description: 
The Creating & Sustaining the Next Generation of Trauma-Informed Practitioners project will implement “Core Concepts First"—a model that combines foundational developmentally informed trauma knowledge with five treatments designed to treat the pervasive developmental effects of trauma. The center's model will transform NCTSN trauma training; and will increase the capacity of practitioners, schools of social work (SSWs), and community agencies to provide children, adolescents, and their families with the most effective trauma-informed treatment. Working with practitioners, community-based agencies, NCSTN Category II sites, and SSWs, the center will implement its Core Concepts First model, which combines NCTSN’s Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma (CCCT) with trauma treatment trainings. The goals of the project are to strengthen trauma training by: 1) increasing practitioners’ knowledge of developmental trauma; 2) transforming the ways in which the NCTSN offers trauma treatment training; 3) creating the infrastructure to assist community agencies to become organizationally ready to introduce and sustain trauma treatment; 4) developing the capacity of practitioners and community agencies to provide developmentally informed trauma care for military families and children, and Native American children; and 5) extending the center's local, regional, and national reach. The populations to be served are community agencies, SSWs, current practitioners and future (now student) practitioners who work with children and youth whose early exposure to multiple episodes of interpersonal violence in the context of deprivation and neglect puts them at increased risk for negative developmental consequences across their lifespan. During the four years of the grant, the project will reach more than 1,500 agency practitioners, 30–40 new SSWs, and more than 2,000 students.
Contact: 
Virginia Strand
Phone: 
(914) 367-3435

Child HELP Partnership, St. John’s University

Funding Period: 
[2005-2009]
Description: 

Child HELP Partnership, develops and operates trauma-specific mental health programs with its innovative, scientifically supported protocols: 1) On the local level, to provide culturally adapted therapy and prevention services free-of-charge to underserved children and families in the surrounding communities. 2) On the national level, to develop and provide trainings, consultation, and oversight on these therapy methods and prevention programs to mental health professionals as well as the general public. These outreach strategies, evaluation tools, therapies, and prevention trainings are improving care across the country.

To ensure remaining on the scientific cutting edge, the programs incorporate evaluation systems for correcting, refining, and enhancing treatment so that the methodology can be continually modified and improved. The goal is to replicate the Child HELP Partnership Center’s well-documented results across the United States and abroad. The Partnership subscribes to the belief that all children deserve safe and happy childhoods, so each and every one can grow up to be a strong and healthy adult.
 
The name Child HELP Partnership reflects an integrated approach in four areas of focus:
•    Healing children after trauma using evidence-based therapies.
•    Empowering multicultural communities with access to the finest culturally sensitive mental health programs
•    Learning programs—both live and virtual—to educate professionals in the most innovative and effective methodologies
•    Public education for parents and others who interact with children on a regular basis, including educators, coaches, and people within their sphere of influence

Partnerships are formed with children with trauma histories, their families, the community as a whole, colleagues in the mental health field, and caregivers, parents, and others who interact with children regularly. These partnerships unite across cultures with all programs created to be language-accessible and culturally informed.
 

Contact: 
Elissa J. Brown
Phone: 
(718) 990-2355

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009 and 2002 - 2005]
Description: 

The Center for Trauma Program Innovation at the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS) develops, adapts, and disseminates trauma-focused assessment and treatment services for traumatized children and adults, with special emphasis on those from low-income and racially diverse neighborhoods who have been exposed to interpersonal and community violence, and who present with the consequences of both acute and chronic traumatic stress.

The Center helps to build the evidence base for promising treatments for trauma in collaboration with other NCTSN member sites, as well as with JBFCS programs. It works to build the capacity of organizations to provide best practice in assessing and treating trauma through training, implementation, and consultation on evidence-based practices. Working with the New York City mental health, child welfare, and educational systems, the Center enhances the ability of professionals within these systems to provide trauma-informed services to the city’s children, and reaches out to businesses and community organizations to provide training in psychological first aid, active coping, and crisis intervention.

JBFCS, an affiliate member of the NCTSN, has been focusing on sustaining evidence-based practice since their renewal grant ended in 2009. Sustainability has been challenging in this fiscal climate and JBFCS has relied on the expertise gained through their involvement with the NCTSN in implementing and sustaining practice in community settings. JBFCS has been able to expand the Sanctuary model to five programs including residential treatment, group home, and domestic violence shelters serving over 1,600 youth and families since 2008. The use of evidence-based practice has also grown from the original implementation of STAIR and Life Skills/ Life Stories to include TFCBT, CPP, SPARCS, and AFCBT in use in 16 programs system wide with over 200 clinicians trained. We have provided crisis interventions to 35 community programs, including schools, synagogues, and community mental health programs reaching over 500 individuals, to help stabilize systems following a critical incident. We have also trained 112 professionals and community members in psychological first aid in order to further create crisis response capacity within the community.

Contact: 
Christina Grosso
Phone: 
(212) 632-4698

Beth Israel Medical Center, BI-SLR HEARTS Program: Healing Emotions and Achieving Resilience to Traumatic Stress (HEARTS)

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016 and 2009-2012]
Description: 
The Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital Centers (BI-SLR) HEARTS program will treat children, youth, and families involved in child welfare and juvenile justice systems, and children/youth of military families—increasing the number who receive culturally competent, evidence-based, trauma-informed services in Beth Israel outpatient clinics and at partner agencies. BI-SLR HEARTS will deliver Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency (ARC) for children aged 5–18 with complex trauma and their families, and Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) for younger children and their caregivers. During the grant period, the program will serve children, youth, and families by screening 6,075; assessing 638; and treating 338. In addition, BI-SLR HEARTS will: 1) train 12 partners; 2) collaborate with SAMHSA and NCTSN to disseminate NCTSN products and participate in NCTSN-Ied activities; and 3) increase awareness of child traumatic stress in multiple child-serving systems and promote trauma-informed policies.
Contact: 
Jacob Ham
Phone: 
(212) 420-4114
Funding Period: 
[2002-2005]
Description: 
Originally founded as an orphanage, the Andrus Children's Center is a treatment, education, and research facility that serves families and children through campus-based programs, community-based initiatives, and mental health programs. The use of the Sanctuary Model of trauma-informed residential care is a key feature of Andrus's work. Andrus joined the NCTSN as a member of the Children's Trauma Consoritum of Westchester, a collaborative with the Center for Preventive Psychiatry, Fordham University's Children's First, and the Westchester Medical Center's Behavioral Health Center.
Contact: 
Kerron Norman
Phone: 
(914) 965-3700 x1258
Email: 

North Shore LIJ Health System’s Department of Psychiatry

Funding Period: 
[2005 - 2009 and 2001 - 2005]
Description: 
North Shore LIJ Health System’s Department of Psychiatry (formerly North Shore University Hospital’s Adolescent Trauma Treatment Development Center) helps alleviate the impact of traumatic stress on children, adolescents, families, and community schools through its Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s outpatient services, school-based consultation program, and Health System programs specifically focusing on the families of military and law enforcement personnel and veterans. North Shore has a long history of responding to community needs after disasters as well as utilization of evidence-based, trauma-informed treatment models. It provides trauma-related training to psychology externs, interns, and post-doctoral fellows as well as providing staff and community education.
Contact: 
Peter D’Amico
Phone: 
(718) 470-8352
Email: 

New York University School of Medicine, NYU CCTS in Child Welfare & Mental Health

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The NYU Center on Coordinated Trauma Services (NYU CCTS) in Child Welfare and Mental Health will be developed by the New York University Child Study Center, in collaboration with the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the New York City Administration on Children's Services (ACS).The NYC CCTS will be an NCTSN Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center focusing on child abuse services, Child Protective Services, and child welfare. The overarching aims are to provide national expertise, and to support the specialized adaptation of effective treatment and service approaches for children and families with trauma-related mental health needs in the child welfare system across the United States. The four main goals are to: 1) raise public awareness of the scope and serious impact of child traumatic stress on children and families in the child welfare system; 2) disseminate effective services and interventions that improve the standard of care for children and families in the child welfare system; 3) advance the capacity of and improve processes in the child welfare system so that the needs of children and families can be better served; and 4) foster a community dedicated to collaboration within and beyond the NCTSN so that knowledge of the needs of children and families in the child welfare system can be improved over time, and so that interventions and services designed to meet these needs can have the greatest possible impact.

Contact: 
Glenn Saxe
Phone: 
(646) 754-5050
Syndicate content